Tagged: help

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Quality of water sold by tanker lorry operators remains unchecked





Wilson Thomas
[2]


COIMBATORE,

May 26, 2017 00:00 IST

Updated:

May 26, 2017 03:41 IST

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Water shortage during the harsh summer has forced many to depend on private water suppliers. However, the quality of potable water sold by tanker lorry operators remains unchecked as there is no mechanism in place for the same.

While quality of packaged drinking water is often checked by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), potable water supplied by private operators in tankers is not checked by the government agency.

‘Not a packaged product’

According to FSSAI officials, potable water supplied in private tankers does not come under their ambit. “Examining the quality of water supplied in tanker lorries does not come under FSSAI as it is not a packaged product. FSSAI examines only packaged drinking water,” said O.L.S. Vijay, designated officer, FSSAI, Coimbatore.

As of now, private water tanker operators do not require any licence or permit to supply potable water or water for other purposes. They either draw water from their own water sources like bore wells and open wells or buy water from those who have the sources.

“The water supplied can be potable or for other purposes. Even if we check water in a tanker, the operator may not admit that it is for drinking purposes. It is difficult for us to prove the same,” said a food safety official.

The corporation has no role in checking the quality, according to officials as the local body is responsible to ensure quality of water supplied by it at times when distribution through pipelines is disrupted.

Meanwhile, most of the hotels in the city which buy potable water from private suppliers, are providing filtered drinking water to customers. According to K. Kathirmathiyon of Coimbatore Consumer Cause, it is advisable for the seller to get the sample of water from the collection centre to be tested once in a while.

“This will help them to ensure their credibility and safety of water supplied to the customers,” said Mr. Kathirmathiyon.

“We spent around Rs 5,000 to purchase potable water a day. While reverse osmosis water is served in the pipeline for hand wash, purified water is given for consumption,” said an owner of one of the restaurants in the city.

According to representatives of Private Water Suppliers’ Association, there are about 5,000 tankers operate in Coimbatore.

These tankers supply water to apartments, hospitals, hotels, schools, private enterprises and houses. After regulations were brought in on drawing water from water bodies, private suppliers mainly depend on bore wells in the rural parts of the district.

References

  1. ^ TAMIL NADU (www.thehindu.com)
  2. ^ Wilson Thomas (www.thehindu.com)
0

Quality of water sold by tanker lorry operators remains unchecked





Wilson Thomas
[2]


COIMBATORE,

May 26, 2017 00:00 IST

Updated:

May 26, 2017 03:41 IST

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Water shortage during the harsh summer has forced many to depend on private water suppliers. However, the quality of potable water sold by tanker lorry operators remains unchecked as there is no mechanism in place for the same.

While quality of packaged drinking water is often checked by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), potable water supplied by private operators in tankers is not checked by the government agency.

‘Not a packaged product’

According to FSSAI officials, potable water supplied in private tankers does not come under their ambit. “Examining the quality of water supplied in tanker lorries does not come under FSSAI as it is not a packaged product. FSSAI examines only packaged drinking water,” said O.L.S. Vijay, designated officer, FSSAI, Coimbatore.

As of now, private water tanker operators do not require any licence or permit to supply potable water or water for other purposes. They either draw water from their own water sources like bore wells and open wells or buy water from those who have the sources.

“The water supplied can be potable or for other purposes. Even if we check water in a tanker, the operator may not admit that it is for drinking purposes. It is difficult for us to prove the same,” said a food safety official.

The corporation has no role in checking the quality, according to officials as the local body is responsible to ensure quality of water supplied by it at times when distribution through pipelines is disrupted.

Meanwhile, most of the hotels in the city which buy potable water from private suppliers, are providing filtered drinking water to customers. According to K. Kathirmathiyon of Coimbatore Consumer Cause, it is advisable for the seller to get the sample of water from the collection centre to be tested once in a while.

“This will help them to ensure their credibility and safety of water supplied to the customers,” said Mr. Kathirmathiyon.

“We spent around Rs 5,000 to purchase potable water a day. While reverse osmosis water is served in the pipeline for hand wash, purified water is given for consumption,” said an owner of one of the restaurants in the city.

According to representatives of Private Water Suppliers’ Association, there are about 5,000 tankers operate in Coimbatore.

These tankers supply water to apartments, hospitals, hotels, schools, private enterprises and houses. After regulations were brought in on drawing water from water bodies, private suppliers mainly depend on bore wells in the rural parts of the district.

References

  1. ^ TAMIL NADU (www.thehindu.com)
  2. ^ Wilson Thomas (www.thehindu.com)
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BITER: Thief bit and spat at brave lorry driver who clung on to stop him escaping

A BRAVE lorry driver who held on to an escaping shop thief, although he was bitten and repeatedly spat at, has been awarded £200 by a judge.

Kevin McCreath detained Tyrone Kerr as he fled with a jar of coffee stolen from a Wibsey[1] convenience store, Bradford Crown Court[2] heard.

Mr McCreath stopped his lorry and ran to help when he saw Kerr, 22, legging it with a bag while being pursued by a female member of staff.

Kerr, of Bessingham Gardens, Buttershaw[3], Bradford, pleaded guilty to theft and to causing Mr McCreath actual bodily harm on April 27.

Prosecutor Andrew Horton said Kerr repeatedly spat at 49-year-old Mr McCreath, pulled his hair and told him he had AIDS. He threw stones and dust at him before biting him on the arm.

Mr McCreath continued to hang on to the violently struggling Kerr until the police arrived to arrest him.

Mr Horton applied for a five year Criminal Behaviour Order (CRIMBO) that prevents Kerr from going into shops wearing a hood or hat, entering any premises he is barred from and remaining on any premises when asked to leave.

Judge Jonathan Rose made an interim CRIMBO while jailing Kerr for 28 months.

Judge Rose said Kerr was a thief with a propensity to violence, using his teeth as his weapon of choice.

His extensive criminal record included attempting to punch and bite two members of the public helping the police detain him after he was caught stealing from the Co-op in Fair Road, Bradford, in November last year.

In August last year, Kerr entered Buttershaw Convenience Store in a hooded top. He punched a staff member up to four times in the head when he tried to stop him stealing from the shop.

Also last August, Kerr hit a member of the public with a bottle of Prosecco he was attempting to make off with and then bit him twice.

Kerr’s barrister, Abigail Langford, said he led a chaotic lifestyle and had long standing problems with drugs and alcohol, dating from his early teens.

He was now in much better health and seeking treatment for his addictions while in custody.

Judge Rose said Kerr resorted to appalling violence to try to stop Mr McCreath detaining him for stealing a jar of coffee worth £13.

He stole from the shop just three weeks after being released from custody for his last offence.

Judge Rose praised Mr McCreath for hanging out to Kerr while suffering a disgusting attack from him.

“He held on, despite repeated violence, and detained him,” he said.

Judge Rose commended Mr McCreath for his courage and awarded him £200 from public funds.

References

  1. ^ Wibsey (www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk)
  2. ^ Court (www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk)
  3. ^ Buttershaw (www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk)