Tagged: mileage

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Councils get keys to £4.2m bin lorry fleet

Adur bin lorries clock up an average annual mileage sufficient to reach Australia – so a new £4.2million fleet will have its work cut out.

Adur and Worthing councils have received the keys to 24 new vehicles, with the ten-year-old fleet due for replacement.

The bright blue lorries, emblazoned with the councils’ redesigned logo, are expected to travel around 8,500 miles a year – almost the distance between Worthing and Perth, in Australia.

Councillor Emma Evans, Adur cabinet member for environment said: “It is great to see the new fleet in place.

“The team have worked very hard throughout the whole procurement process to ensure we have obtained the best value for our residents and this fleet delivers just that as well important environmental benefits.”

The cost of the replacement vehicles will be partly offset by the old fleet being sold at auction.

The lorries will serve three different purposes. Three will solely deal with commercial waste, eight will collect recycling and 13 will have separate compartments for domestic waste and garden rubbish.

Councillor Diane Guest, Worthing cabinet member for environment, said: “For many people, the most visible part of a council’s services is having their bins emptied every week and we are showing with the introduction of our new fleet that we will continue to put residents at the heart of everything we do.”

The councils’ waste strategy manager Paul Willis is among a number of staff penning regular posts online.

The authorities also published a series of question and answer articles from members of the refuse team.

They include tales of staff being chased by dogs while collecting bins from front gardens, residents locking themselves out when coming to greet them and coming to their aid in medical emergencies.

One of them, Richard Foster, said: “I had to phone 999 to help someone having a heart attack and also an injured cyclist who was knocked off their bike.”

The old refuse vehicles each collected an estimated 27,500 tonnes of rubbish in their ten years.

Most of it was normal household waste – but staff reported more unusual finds including a motorbike, live chicken and a grim discovery of nine dead cats. Visit adur-worthing.gov.uk to read posts from council staff.

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Councils gets keys to £4.2m bin lorry fleet

Adur bin lorries clock up an average annual mileage sufficient to reach Australia – so a new £4.2million fleet will have its work cut out.

Adur and Worthing councils have received the keys to 24 new vehicles, with the ten-year-old fleet due for replacement.

The bright blue lorries, emblazoned with the councils’ redesigned logo, are expected to travel around 8,500 miles a year – almost the distance between Worthing and Perth, in Australia.

Councillor Emma Evans, Adur cabinet member for environment said: “It is great to see the new fleet in place.

“The team have worked very hard throughout the whole procurement process to ensure we have obtained the best value for our residents and this fleet delivers just that as well important environmental benefits.”

The cost of the replacement vehicles will be partly offset by the old fleet being sold at auction.

The lorries will serve three different purposes. Three will solely deal with commercial waste, eight will collect recycling and 13 will have separate compartments for domestic waste and garden rubbish.

Councillor Diane Guest, Worthing cabinet member for environment, said: “For many people, the most visible part of a council’s services is having their bins emptied every week and we are showing with the introduction of our new fleet that we will continue to put residents at the heart of everything we do.”

The councils’ waste strategy manager Paul Willis is among a number of staff penning regular posts online.

The authorities also published a series of question and answer articles from members of the refuse team.

They include tales of staff being chased by dogs while collecting bins from front gardens, residents locking themselves out when coming to greet them and coming to their aid in medical emergencies.

One of them, Richard Foster, said: “I had to phone 999 to help someone having a heart attack and also an injured cyclist who was knocked off their bike.”

The old refuse vehicles each collected an estimated 27,500 tonnes of rubbish in their ten years.

Most of it was normal household waste – but staff reported more unusual finds including a motorbike, live chicken and a grim discovery of nine dead cats. Visit adur-worthing.gov.uk to read posts from council staff.

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Trucks become a cause for concern on SA roads’

MOKOPANE – Trucks are a big concern on our roads, especially the ones travelling from Zambia transporting copper, said Andy Goetsch, President of the Mokopane Business Chamber.

“Most of these trucks are old, travelling at a slow speed, and therefore slow down traffic. They usually travel in a large convey making it even more difficult for South African truck drivers to pass.”

Goetsch said that there is not much that can be done to protect our roads, but he urged the municipalities to charge these trucks and companies tax fees as they are travelling on our roads for free.

He added that Mokopane’s roads are in a very bad state in certain streets where the trucks travel a lot and that something must be done fast to avoid further damage.

The Mogalakwena Municipality has been asked if they can do anything to ensure a safer road for residents as well as trucks to drive on, but no reply has been received by the time of going to print.

According to the Road Traffic Management Corporation, 36 major crashes involving trucks were investigated last year.

Altogether 143 fatalities and 136 injuries resulted from these accidents which involved 49 trucks, 35 light motor vehicles and 11 minibuses.

Mike De Lange, owner of the Mike De Lange Service Centre and a member of the Motor Industry Workshop Association (MIWA), believes these accidents can be attributed to a lack of maintenance on trucks and negligence.

Schoeman street is in a horrible condition.

De Lange, who specialises in the servicing of trucks, says he often sees truck owners trying to save on expenses and not doing regular inspections. “Trucks are not being serviced as regularly as they should be and to a standard that is good enough for our roads,” he says.

Along with that, De Lange believes that stricter laws should apply to who should be allowed to own a truck. “Anybody can buy a truck and put an underpaid and unskilled driver behind the steering wheel.

“This results in major risk on our roads. The industry is also being compromised due to some stakeholders hiring and repairing on the cheap and then offering the cheapest quote possible for their services, undercutting other stakeholders.

“Drivers should receive special training besides the requirements needed to get a code 14 licence. I don’t believe this is being done or done properly. Drivers also do not seem to understand the importance thereof,” he says.

Vishal Premlall, Director of MIWA, agrees saying the number of truck accidents each year is unacceptable. “You just need to drive on any of our major highways to see that many trucks are not roadworthy and not being maintained. Besides the obvious accident risk these vehicles present there is also the pollution factor and potential loss of cargo and damage to property when accidents happen. The answer is regular maintenance and better training,” he says.

Premlall says regular maintenance is also the only way to guard against major repairs.

“Truck owners may believe they are saving by avoiding regular servicing but it ultimately costs far more when a major component needs replacing because it wasn’t properly maintained. The key is to watch the mileage and months and to refer to the service booklet for when services are required. There are accredited workshops around the country who specialise in truck servicing at affordable rates. It pays to do your homework and find a workshop near you,” he says.

Another worrying trend is the number of truck drivers that drive in the fast lanes, despite their trucks being limited to lower speeds. “Young and inexperienced drivers often don’t fully understand the mechanical condition of the truck nor the safe braking distances needed to stop the truck in the event of an emergency.”

He adds there needs to be a clamping down from authorities on unroadworthy trucks and reckless drivers. “Trucks are a major risk factor on our roads and authorities need to be stricter on how these vehicles are being policed. Handing out fines and releasing dangerous vehicles and drivers back on to our roads is not good enough,” he says.

redaksie.bosvelder@nmgroup.co.za[1]

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References

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