Tagged: safety

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Quality of water sold by tanker lorry operators remains unchecked





Wilson Thomas
[2]


COIMBATORE,

May 26, 2017 00:00 IST

Updated:

May 26, 2017 03:41 IST

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Water shortage during the harsh summer has forced many to depend on private water suppliers. However, the quality of potable water sold by tanker lorry operators remains unchecked as there is no mechanism in place for the same.

While quality of packaged drinking water is often checked by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), potable water supplied by private operators in tankers is not checked by the government agency.

‘Not a packaged product’

According to FSSAI officials, potable water supplied in private tankers does not come under their ambit. “Examining the quality of water supplied in tanker lorries does not come under FSSAI as it is not a packaged product. FSSAI examines only packaged drinking water,” said O.L.S. Vijay, designated officer, FSSAI, Coimbatore.

As of now, private water tanker operators do not require any licence or permit to supply potable water or water for other purposes. They either draw water from their own water sources like bore wells and open wells or buy water from those who have the sources.

“The water supplied can be potable or for other purposes. Even if we check water in a tanker, the operator may not admit that it is for drinking purposes. It is difficult for us to prove the same,” said a food safety official.

The corporation has no role in checking the quality, according to officials as the local body is responsible to ensure quality of water supplied by it at times when distribution through pipelines is disrupted.

Meanwhile, most of the hotels in the city which buy potable water from private suppliers, are providing filtered drinking water to customers. According to K. Kathirmathiyon of Coimbatore Consumer Cause, it is advisable for the seller to get the sample of water from the collection centre to be tested once in a while.

“This will help them to ensure their credibility and safety of water supplied to the customers,” said Mr. Kathirmathiyon.

“We spent around Rs 5,000 to purchase potable water a day. While reverse osmosis water is served in the pipeline for hand wash, purified water is given for consumption,” said an owner of one of the restaurants in the city.

According to representatives of Private Water Suppliers’ Association, there are about 5,000 tankers operate in Coimbatore.

These tankers supply water to apartments, hospitals, hotels, schools, private enterprises and houses. After regulations were brought in on drawing water from water bodies, private suppliers mainly depend on bore wells in the rural parts of the district.

References

  1. ^ TAMIL NADU (www.thehindu.com)
  2. ^ Wilson Thomas (www.thehindu.com)
0

Quality of water sold by tanker lorry operators remains unchecked





Wilson Thomas
[2]


COIMBATORE,

May 26, 2017 00:00 IST

Updated:

May 26, 2017 03:41 IST

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Water shortage during the harsh summer has forced many to depend on private water suppliers. However, the quality of potable water sold by tanker lorry operators remains unchecked as there is no mechanism in place for the same.

While quality of packaged drinking water is often checked by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), potable water supplied by private operators in tankers is not checked by the government agency.

‘Not a packaged product’

According to FSSAI officials, potable water supplied in private tankers does not come under their ambit. “Examining the quality of water supplied in tanker lorries does not come under FSSAI as it is not a packaged product. FSSAI examines only packaged drinking water,” said O.L.S. Vijay, designated officer, FSSAI, Coimbatore.

As of now, private water tanker operators do not require any licence or permit to supply potable water or water for other purposes. They either draw water from their own water sources like bore wells and open wells or buy water from those who have the sources.

“The water supplied can be potable or for other purposes. Even if we check water in a tanker, the operator may not admit that it is for drinking purposes. It is difficult for us to prove the same,” said a food safety official.

The corporation has no role in checking the quality, according to officials as the local body is responsible to ensure quality of water supplied by it at times when distribution through pipelines is disrupted.

Meanwhile, most of the hotels in the city which buy potable water from private suppliers, are providing filtered drinking water to customers. According to K. Kathirmathiyon of Coimbatore Consumer Cause, it is advisable for the seller to get the sample of water from the collection centre to be tested once in a while.

“This will help them to ensure their credibility and safety of water supplied to the customers,” said Mr. Kathirmathiyon.

“We spent around Rs 5,000 to purchase potable water a day. While reverse osmosis water is served in the pipeline for hand wash, purified water is given for consumption,” said an owner of one of the restaurants in the city.

According to representatives of Private Water Suppliers’ Association, there are about 5,000 tankers operate in Coimbatore.

These tankers supply water to apartments, hospitals, hotels, schools, private enterprises and houses. After regulations were brought in on drawing water from water bodies, private suppliers mainly depend on bore wells in the rural parts of the district.

References

  1. ^ TAMIL NADU (www.thehindu.com)
  2. ^ Wilson Thomas (www.thehindu.com)
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Expo targets those working in resource sectors in Canada’s north

PRINCE GEORGE, B.C. – Every two years those in the logging, mining, trucking, and other resource sectors in Canada’s north gather to showcase the latest and greatest in machinery and technology.

Moira Pellerine, marketing and operations manager for Master Promotions, which puts on the Canada North Resources Expo (CNRE), said the heaviest emphasis is put on forestry, but the show includes equipment, parts, and services from a variety of sectors, including companies looking to bring on new employees.

Pellerine said the CNRE reaches out to those from across the country “to bring people working the industry to come and check out the newest technologies and interact with people face-to-face.”

She said recruiters are focusing on finding people who would like to be vehicle operators, which are needed in several sectors at this time and difficult to retain.

“It’s a good sign for the industry,” Pellerine said of the number of companies looking to hire, “and it’s a good sign for those looking to get into the industry.”

The show runs May 26 and 27, with Saturday being Future of the Industry Day, encouraging families to bring their children, who may want to work in one of Canada’s northern resource sectors one day.

“We encourage the men and women working in the sectors to bring their children to get introduced to these sectors,” said Pellerine, “because these sectors are what makes B.C. successful and prominent and Canada successful and prominent.”

Saturday will also feature an interior safety conference put on by B.C. Forest Safety and will focus on building strong supervisors and strong teams. Breakout sessions will also be held this afternoon (May 26). The event is being held at Prince George’s CN Centre.

Visit www.cnre.ca for more information.
[1]

References

  1. ^ www.cnre.ca (www.cnre.ca)