Monthly Archive: June 2017

One last ride: a convoy fit for a beloved tow truck driver

They towed Bob DeWitt home on Friday.

A convoy of more than 20 trucks led the a procession to the funeral for longtime Fredericton tow truck operator, who died Tuesday. 

DeWitt, who owned Bob’s Towing Ltd., spent many years teaching and grooming other operators in the ropes of the business. 

He died after a long battle with leukemia.

bob dewitt funeral convoy

More than 20 tow trucks form a convey in honour of Bob DeWitt, whose funeral as Friday. (Nathalie Sturgeon/CBC )

Brent Dunphy, owner of Dunphy’s Towing, knew DeWitt his whole life and said the towing community will miss him.

“We’re gathering today to pay tribute to Bob’s towing because he’s touched everybody’s life in the towing industry at one time or another,” said Dunphy.

Dunphy described Dewitt as outgoing and kind but a tough man. 

“When I told him I wanted to get my class one driver’s licence, Bob said, ‘Come out to my business and you can do it there, no problem.’ So when I was doing my driving [instruction], Bob was always the first to come over and tell me what I was doing wrong.”

bob dewitt funeral convoy

Bob DeWitt died Tuesday after a battle with leukemia. He was 73. (Bishop’s Funeral Home)

DeWitt took Dunphy under his wing, allowing him to explore what he could do as a towing operator.

Tow truck operators came from Moncton and Miramichi as well to be apart of the convoy.

‘A hard working guy’

For John Carter, an organizer of the convoy and operator at AA towing, said that despite a fierce competition among towing companies in the city, operators will come together for the right reason.

“For these guys to come together like they did to support the family and give the respect they did was, for making the journey, it was really surprising, I was really happy with the outcome,” Carter said.

He said the other operators were acknowledging Carter’s commitment and his contribution to the towing community.

bob dewitt funeral convoy

Lloyd Munn, a retired tow truck operator who remembers being called to accidents with DeWitt, holds a photo of both of them out on a job. (Nathalie Sturgeon/CBC )

“Bob was a hard-working guy, really hard-working guy, hard to get along with at times but he always done the job,” said Carter. “He’s always poured out his life [for] the community, he’s always been around for people in need.”

30 years of experience

Discussion of memories could be heard over the hum of the large trucks, telling stories of DeWitt and his character. 

Retired tow truck operator Lloyd Munn held up an picture showing him and DeWitt going to an accident when the Jemseg bridge was being built.

He said there was an accident between a transport and a car and both he and DeWitt were called to help move the vehicles. The photo shows both Munn and DeWitt arms outstretched and smiles on both their faces.

Brian Clarke of Clarke’s towing said that DeWitt was there whenever anyone needed him.

“He was a good friend,” he said. “He would do anything for you, so that’s why I’m here today.”

Investors Are Circling Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV …

Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) currently has a current ratio of 7.25. The current ratio, which is also known as the working capital ratio, is a liquidity ratio that displays the proportion of current assets of a business relative to the current liabilities. The ratio is simply calculated by dividing current liabilities by current assets. The ratio may be used to provide an idea of the ability of a certain company to pay back its liabilities with assets. Typically, the higher the current ratio the better, as the company may be more capable of paying back its obligations and in turn a more healthy balance sheet.

Yield
The Q.i. Value of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 26.00000.  The Q.i. Value is a helpful tool in determining if a company is undervalued or not.  The Q.i. Value is calculated using the following ratios: EBITDA Yield, Earnings Yield, FCF Yield, and Liquidity.  The lower the Q.i. value, the more undervalued the company is thought to be.  The Value Composite One (VC1) is a method that investors use to determine a company’s value.  The VC1 of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 50.  A company with a value of 0 is thought to be an undervalued company, while a company with a value of 100 is considered an overvalued company.  The VC1 is calculated using the price to book value, price to sales, EBITDA to EV, price to cash flow, and price to earnings.  Similarly, the Value Composite Two (VC2) is calculated with the same ratios, but adds the Shareholder Yield.  The Value Composite Two of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 51.

Volatility & Price
Stock volatility is a percentage that indicates whether a stock is a desirable purchase.  Investors look at the Volatility 12m to determine if a company has a low volatility percentage or not over the course of a year.  The Volatility 12m of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 0.000000.  This is calculated by taking weekly log normal returns and standard deviation of the share price over one year annualized.  The lower the number, a company is thought to have low volatility.  The Volatility 3m is a similar percentage determined by the daily log normal returns and standard deviation of the share price over 3 months.  The Volatility 3m of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 24.784400.  The Volatility 6m is the same, except measured over the course of six months.  The Volatility 6m is 25.287200.

We can now take a quick look at some historical stock price index data. Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) presently has a 10 month price index of 1.38815. The price index is calculated by dividing the current share price by the share price ten months ago. A ratio over one indicates an increase in share price over the period. A ratio lower than one shows that the price has decreased over that time period. Looking at some alternate time periods, the 12 month price index is 1.38815, the 24 month is 1.38815, and the 36 month is 1.38815. Narrowing in a bit closer, the 5 month price index is 1.26702, the 3 month is 1.25823, and the 1 month is currently 1.00610.

Key Metrics

The Piotroski F-Score is a scoring system between 1-9 that determines a firm’s financial strength.  The score helps determine if a company’s stock is valuable or not.  The Piotroski F-Score of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 4.  A score of nine indicates a high value stock, while a score of one indicates a low value stock.  The score is calculated by the return on assets (ROA), Cash flow return on assets (CFROA), change in return of assets, and quality of earnings.  It is also calculated by a change in gearing or leverage, liquidity, and change in shares in issue.  The score is also determined by change in gross margin and change in asset turnover.

The ERP5 Rank is an investment tool that analysts use to discover undervalued companies.  The ERP5 looks at the Price to Book ratio, Earnings Yield, ROIC and 5 year average ROIC.  The ERP5 of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 17165.  The lower the ERP5 rank, the more undervalued a company is thought to be. The MF Rank (aka the Magic Formula) is a formula that pinpoints a valuable company trading at a good price.  The formula is calculated by looking at companies that have a high earnings yield as well as a high return on invested capital.  The MF Rank of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 2979.  A company with a low rank is considered a good company to invest in.  The Magic Formula was introduced in a book written by Joel Greenblatt, entitled, “The Little Book that Beats the Market”.

The Leverage Ratio of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 0.579902.  Leverage ratio is the total debt of a company divided by total assets of the current and past year divided by two.  Companies take on debt to finance their day to day operations.  The leverage ratio can measure how much of a company’s capital comes from debt.  With this ratio, investors can better estimate how well a company will be able to pay their long and short term financial obligations.

C-Score
Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) currently has a Montier C-score of 4.00000. This indicator was developed by James Montier in an attempt to identify firms that were cooking the books in order to appear better on paper. The score ranges from zero to six where a 0 would indicate no evidence of book cooking, and a 6 would indicate a high likelihood. A C-score of -1 would indicate that there is not enough information available to calculate the score. Montier used six inputs in the calculation. These inputs included a growing difference between net income and cash flow from operations, increasing receivable days, growing day’s sales of inventory, increasing other current assets, decrease in depreciation relative to gross property plant and equipment, and high total asset growth.

Investors Are Circling Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV), What Do the Numbers Tell Us?

Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) currently has a current ratio of 7.25. The current ratio, which is also known as the working capital ratio, is a liquidity ratio that displays the proportion of current assets of a business relative to the current liabilities. The ratio is simply calculated by dividing current liabilities by current assets. The ratio may be used to provide an idea of the ability of a certain company to pay back its liabilities with assets. Typically, the higher the current ratio the better, as the company may be more capable of paying back its obligations and in turn a more healthy balance sheet.

Yield
The Q.i. Value of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 26.00000.  The Q.i. Value is a helpful tool in determining if a company is undervalued or not.  The Q.i. Value is calculated using the following ratios: EBITDA Yield, Earnings Yield, FCF Yield, and Liquidity.  The lower the Q.i. value, the more undervalued the company is thought to be.  The Value Composite One (VC1) is a method that investors use to determine a company’s value.  The VC1 of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 50.  A company with a value of 0 is thought to be an undervalued company, while a company with a value of 100 is considered an overvalued company.  The VC1 is calculated using the price to book value, price to sales, EBITDA to EV, price to cash flow, and price to earnings.  Similarly, the Value Composite Two (VC2) is calculated with the same ratios, but adds the Shareholder Yield.  The Value Composite Two of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 51.

Volatility & Price
Stock volatility is a percentage that indicates whether a stock is a desirable purchase.  Investors look at the Volatility 12m to determine if a company has a low volatility percentage or not over the course of a year.  The Volatility 12m of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 0.000000.  This is calculated by taking weekly log normal returns and standard deviation of the share price over one year annualized.  The lower the number, a company is thought to have low volatility.  The Volatility 3m is a similar percentage determined by the daily log normal returns and standard deviation of the share price over 3 months.  The Volatility 3m of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 24.784400.  The Volatility 6m is the same, except measured over the course of six months.  The Volatility 6m is 25.287200.

We can now take a quick look at some historical stock price index data. Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) presently has a 10 month price index of 1.38815. The price index is calculated by dividing the current share price by the share price ten months ago. A ratio over one indicates an increase in share price over the period. A ratio lower than one shows that the price has decreased over that time period. Looking at some alternate time periods, the 12 month price index is 1.38815, the 24 month is 1.38815, and the 36 month is 1.38815. Narrowing in a bit closer, the 5 month price index is 1.26702, the 3 month is 1.25823, and the 1 month is currently 1.00610.

Key Metrics

The Piotroski F-Score is a scoring system between 1-9 that determines a firm’s financial strength.  The score helps determine if a company’s stock is valuable or not.  The Piotroski F-Score of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 4.  A score of nine indicates a high value stock, while a score of one indicates a low value stock.  The score is calculated by the return on assets (ROA), Cash flow return on assets (CFROA), change in return of assets, and quality of earnings.  It is also calculated by a change in gearing or leverage, liquidity, and change in shares in issue.  The score is also determined by change in gross margin and change in asset turnover.

The ERP5 Rank is an investment tool that analysts use to discover undervalued companies.  The ERP5 looks at the Price to Book ratio, Earnings Yield, ROIC and 5 year average ROIC.  The ERP5 of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 17165.  The lower the ERP5 rank, the more undervalued a company is thought to be. The MF Rank (aka the Magic Formula) is a formula that pinpoints a valuable company trading at a good price.  The formula is calculated by looking at companies that have a high earnings yield as well as a high return on invested capital.  The MF Rank of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 2979.  A company with a low rank is considered a good company to invest in.  The Magic Formula was introduced in a book written by Joel Greenblatt, entitled, “The Little Book that Beats the Market”.

The Leverage Ratio of Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) is 0.579902.  Leverage ratio is the total debt of a company divided by total assets of the current and past year divided by two.  Companies take on debt to finance their day to day operations.  The leverage ratio can measure how much of a company’s capital comes from debt.  With this ratio, investors can better estimate how well a company will be able to pay their long and short term financial obligations.

C-Score
Hilton Grand Vacations Inc. (NYSE:HGV) currently has a Montier C-score of 4.00000. This indicator was developed by James Montier in an attempt to identify firms that were cooking the books in order to appear better on paper. The score ranges from zero to six where a 0 would indicate no evidence of book cooking, and a 6 would indicate a high likelihood. A C-score of -1 would indicate that there is not enough information available to calculate the score. Montier used six inputs in the calculation. These inputs included a growing difference between net income and cash flow from operations, increasing receivable days, growing day’s sales of inventory, increasing other current assets, decrease in depreciation relative to gross property plant and equipment, and high total asset growth.

Truck driver is accused of dumping sewage at Phoenix school

Updated 5:09 pm, Friday, June 30, 2017

PHOENIX (AP) — A truck driver for a Phoenix company has been indicted for allegedly dumping thousands of gallons of sewage into a school’s storm drainage system.

The Arizona Attorney General’s Office[1] says a state grand jury indicted Michael Wayne Higgins[2] on one count each of unlawful discharge and criminal damage.

Authorities say Higgins was working as a tanker truck driver for Emergency Pumping & Plumbing last August when he allegedly dumped the sewage at the Austin School for Exceptional Children Phoenix West Campus[3].

The storm drainage system reportedly flowed from the school’s parking lot into a grassy area that was used as a playground.

Authorities say cleanup costs were nearly $4,000.

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality[4] assisted in the investigation of the case.

It was unclear Friday if Higgins has an attorney.

References

  1. ^ Arizona Attorney General’s Office (www.mysanantonio.com)
  2. ^ Michael Wayne Higgins (www.mysanantonio.com)
  3. ^ Austin School for Exceptional Children Phoenix West Campus (www.mysanantonio.com)
  4. ^ Department of Environmental Quality (www.mysanantonio.com)

Man in serious condition after 2-car crash on GSP

CLOSE

If you get into a crash, do you know what to do? Here are 10 tips. KATIE PARK

LAKEWOOD – A truck struck a sedan and ran off the side of the Garden State Parkway in the area of Lakewood, leaving at least one driver with serious injuries Friday, New Jersey State Police said. 

Information on the drivers was not immediately available, Trooper Lawrence Peele of the State Police said. Peele said a Ford Bronco truck collided with a Toyota Corolla in the northbound lanes, severely injuring the truck driver. He did not have information on the driver of the Toyota. 

The truck sustained moderate injury in the crash, Peele said. He did not have information on where the Corolla was struck by the truck. 

The crash slowed traffic. First responders were spotted at the scene about 4:50 p.m.

Andrew Ford: 732-643-4281; [email protected]

Don’t miss a thing

Search for Asbury Park Press to get our apps Download our apps and get alerts for local news, weather, traffic and more. Search “Asbury Park Press” in your app store or use these links from your device: iPhone app | Android app for phone and tablet | iPad app >>>Subscribe (at a great sale price!) for full access. And, ‘like’ us on Facebook![1][2][3][4][5]

Read or Share this story: http://on.app.com/2tyTkjO

References

  1. ^ iPhone app (itunes.apple.com)
  2. ^ Android app for phone and tablet (play.google.com)
  3. ^ iPad app (itunes.apple.com)
  4. ^ Subscribe (at a great sale price!) for full access. (offers.app.com)
  5. ^ ‘like’ us on Facebook! (www.facebook.com)

Woman dies after bring hit by truck in Montreal North

A 76-year-old woman has died after being struck by a cube truck in Montreal North around noon Friday.

Police say the truck was backing up on Léger Boulevard, near Langelier Boulevard, when it hit the woman.

When police arrived, the woman was on the ground. She was transported to hospital in critical condition and later died.

Police say witnesses told them she had been crossing between two intersections and didn’t appear to see the truck backing up.

The truck driver was treated for shock at the scene.

Walmart Meets with Female Truck Drivers

 Added on June 30, 2017  The News Wheel[1]   , , , , [2][3][4][5][6]

No Comments

Study Semi Truck Drivers in Short Supply as Demand Keeps IncreasingWhen you think of truck drivers, the stereotypical image that usually comes to mind is that of a burly man behind the wheel[7]. While a majority of truck drivers are men, there is a growing group of female truck drivers taking to America’s highways to earn their living. Recently America’s largest retailer, Wal-Mart Stores Inc[8], the company that owns Walmart stores, met with its women truckers to learn about what can be done to make the industry more welcoming to their gender.


Drive The Latest and Greatest: Consider leasing a new vehicle[9]


The meeting, branded as a Women in Trucking conference, featured talks from Wal-Mart senior officials and truck manufacturers. Participants also met with a self-defense expert to prepare them for some of the perils of the road. While many discussion topics were spurred on by gender, several concepts introduced will also benefit male drivers. For instance, some of the challenges faced by female truck drivers have to do with their smaller stature. Women are, on average, the shorter gender, but there are still men who face the same issues female truck drivers do. The women also suggested a removable portable toilet in the truck’s cabs for when you really need to go but do not feel safe or comfortable leaving the truck.


Just as Good: Learn the benefits of buying a used car[10]


When it comes to safety, the woman pushed for trucking companies to make sure that truck cabs have unique keys to access them. To make maintaining key systems easier, several trucks in a fleet can be opened with a single key. While it might make a little sense for business, it left female truck drivers feeling unsafe to sleep in their trucks or lock valuables inside.

The women were excited to hear that Wal-Mart was taking the initiative to hire more female drivers in the future[11]. Maybe soon the idea of a female truck driver won’t seem that unique.

News Source: Arkansas Online[12]

References

  1. ^ The News Wheel (thenewswheel.com)
  2. ^ (thenewswheel.com)
  3. ^ (thenewswheel.com)
  4. ^ (thenewswheel.com)
  5. ^ (thenewswheel.com)
  6. ^ (thenewswheel.com)
  7. ^ a burly man behind the wheel (thenewswheel.com)
  8. ^ Wal-Mart Stores Inc (thenewswheel.com)
  9. ^ Consider leasing a new vehicle (www.crumbackchevy.com)
  10. ^ Learn the benefits of buying a used car (www.crumbackchevy.com)
  11. ^ hire more female drivers in the future (thenewswheel.com)
  12. ^ Arkansas Online (www.arkansasonline.com)

After 3 Extreme Road Rage Incidents, Experts Warn July 4 Drivers to Take Caution

Travel over the July Fourth weekend is expected to reach its highest level ever in the history of the D.C. metro area, and experts are warning those travelers to be mindful of road rage after three incidents in which people were severely injured or killed.

About 1.1 million people will be traveling over the weekend. Of them, about 87 percent will be traveling by car, according to projections by the American Automobile Association’s Mid-Atlantic offices released Wednesday.

With a series of high-profile road rage incidents in recent weeks, AAA Mid-Atlantic Spokesman John Townsend was reminded of a study his organization released last year[1]. The key finding: “nearly 80 percent of drivers express significant anger, aggression or road rage.”

“It’s shocking, it talks about what people confess to in cutting other drivers off, or honking at another driver or making obscene gestures,” Townsend said. “It’s becoming pandemic and pernicious on the highways and it can easily lead to aggressive driving, road rage and those kinds of things.”

One high-profile road rage incident on a Southern California freeway, between a motorcyclist and a driver, was caught on camera[2]. The resulting crash sent an innocent person to the hospital on June 21, authorities said.

“It can just become very volatile,” Townsend said. “People have gotten out of their car to verbally confront somebody because they were upset and the numbers are just astonishing, and it involves millions of American drivers.”

In a recent incident in Northern Virginia, a driver got out of his car and beat 17-year-old Nabra Hassanen[3] to death with a baseball bat, according to police. Hassanen was returning to an all-night prayer session during Ramadan. Police believe she was a victim of road rage.

To a certain extent, “road rage is part and parcel of the commute in the Washington metro area,” Townsend conceded. “We’re going to have about 39 million people driving by car for the holiday season….so, we may see a spike in those incidents.”

Another road rage incident occurred in Philadelphia on Wednesday, June 28. Officials say a pickup truck driver murdered 18-year-old Bianca Roberson[4], after she merged lanes at the same time as the other driver.

“The man in the red pickup truck shot her directly in the head,” Chester County District Attorney Tom Hogan said Thursday. The incident has evolved into a manhunt for the truck driver.

These incidents are on the extreme end of the road rage spectrum. Indeed, AAA’s study last year highlighted varying degrees of road rage responses, some all too common. For instance, 67 million drivers admitted to “making angry gestures,” and 7.6 million admitted to “getting out of the vehicle to confront another driver.”

“What we say to people is that when you are traveling, add 10 to 15 minutes to your trip so in case you’re stuck in traffic, in case there’s something unforeseen that happens, you don’t panic and get upset,” Townsend said.

And when the unavoidable does happen, and a fellow motorist loses their cool with you, “do not engage the other driver,” Townsend said. “It’s only going to escalate the situation.”

Published 2 hours ago

References

  1. ^ reminded of a study his organization released last year (newsroom.aaa.com)
  2. ^ caught on camera (www.nbclosangeles.com)
  3. ^ 17-year-old Nabra Hassanen (www.nbcwashington.com)
  4. ^ 18-year-old Bianca Roberson (www.nbcphiladelphia.com)