'We offer a free car ventilation service

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‘We offer a free car ventilation service – all you have to do is lock your dog in your car’: Police inspector warns that his officers will NOT hesitate to break into cars to save pets in 95F heatwave

  • Richard Berns, from Camden, London, tweeted photo of smashed car window
  • Temperatures for dogs trapped inside cars can soar within just 15 minutes
  • Comes as RSPCA received 1,110 calls about animals in the heat in just a week

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A police inspector has won the respect of the nation after offering a ‘free car ventilation service’ for people who leave dogs in hot cars during the heatwave.

Inspector Richard Berns, from Camden in north London, tweeted a photo of a smashed car window from which he had just rescued a dog.

He wrote: ‘We offer a free car ventilation service. All you have to do, is leave a dog locked in a hot car, we do the rest.’

Five dogs were rescued from scorching temperatures in just two days last week as Britain’s heatwave continues to set the mercury soaring.

Even when temperatures are in the low 20s the heat within a car can rocket quickly, leaving trapped animals with heatstroke or even causing their deaths.

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Inspector Richard Berns, from Camden in north London, tweeted this warning to pet owners who leave their dogs in hot cars

Many pet owners are seemingly unaware of the dangers, not realising that a cool air-conditioned car can quickly turn into a sauna while sat in the sun.

RSPCA inspector Anthony Joynes has shared a video of himself locked inside a sweltering van for 30 minutes to show the torturous conditions many dogs are facing this summer.

Despite having two windows rolled down two inches, after just half an hour Mr Joynes had to give up. He was hosed down by medical staff to get his body temperature back to normal.

He said: ‘By the end of the 30 minutes it was 44.6C (112F).

It was like the Sahara Desert.

‘I was wet through with sweat and I felt quite sick, I just couldn’t think properly because the heat affected me so much.

‘Just imagine how much worse it must be for a dog who, in effect, is wearing a fur coat. I also had my windows cracked open more than most people would leave them.’

It comes as the RSPCA revealed they received 1,110 calls about animals in hot temperatures in the past week, the majority of which are about dogs trapped in hot cars.

'We offer a free car ventilation service

RSPCA inspector Anthony Joynes had to give up after 30 minutes in the sweltering van. He said: ‘Just imagine how much worse it must be for a dog who, in effect, is wearing a fur coat’

'We offer a free car ventilation service

A teenager spotted this dog who was trapped inside a car outside a McDonald’s in Frome, Somerset, for 40 minutes on Monday

Members of the public who spot a canine locked in a car are encouraged to call both the police and the RSPCA. Without the police present breaking into a car may be classified as criminal damage.

Many Twitter users have praised Mr Berns for issuing the warning to pet owners and saving the trapped dog before temperatures in the car became too dangerous.

One wrote: ‘Excellent!

Follow it up with a “free” report to the RSPCA and a “free” fine too! These people do not deserve to have a loving pet.’

Another said: ‘Thank you for providing this life saving service.’

One individual added: ‘Brilliant work. It’s incredibly selfish and dangerous for people to leave pets in hot cars – and I’m really pleased Camden Police are doing something about it.’

Last Monday Gabrielle Dart shared a video showing a dog who had been allegedly trapped inside a truck for 40 minutes outside a McDonald’s restaurant in Frome, Somerset.

'We offer a free car ventilation service

Police were called to the rescue of a dog locked inside a vehicle at the Cheshire Oaks shopping centre

'We offer a free car ventilation service

Pictures taken at the scene show the moment two officers smashed the window of the car to get to the dogs

The teenager shared the video saying that the canine had honked the vehicle’s horn as it grew more and more desperate amid 27C temperatures.

But after they reported it to the police, she says they returned to the scene to find the truck had gone.

The same day police were called to the rescue of the ‘distressed’ dog locked inside a vehicle at the Cheshire Oaks shopping centre in blazing 86F (30C).

Onlooker Jason Mcdonnell King said the pet was left inside the car for more than an hour before being let out ‘panting’ and rushed to the vets.

And officers on Tuesday ‘struggled to breathe’ as they dived in a car and rescued Labradors from an 86F car in York.

On the same day, another dog was left panting and distressed after being locked in a car in Stockton-on-Tees, Durham.

What are the effects on a dog trapped in a hot car?

'We offer a free car ventilation service

Heat can rise dramatically inside a car, causing a dog to suffer heatstroke which can lead to their death – in just ten minutes

A car can become as hot as an oven very quickly, even when it doesn’t feel that warm.

When it’s 22 degrees, in a car it can reach an unbearable 47 degrees within the hour.

Heat can rise dramatically inside a car, causing a dog to suffer heatstroke which can lead to their death – in just ten minutes.

A dog’s normal body temperature is around 39?C (102?F). Although the upper lethal body temperature of dogs is approximately 42?C (108?F), brain damage may develop at body temperatures of 41?C (106?F).

Symptoms of a dog suffering heatstroke include it panting heavily, drooling excessively or vomiting.

If the windows are left open or they’re parked in the shade, it’s still a very dangerous situation for the dog

What to do if you spot a dog locked inside a car:

If you see a dog in distress you can call the RSPCA 24-hour cruelty line for advice on 0300 1234 999 but if you feel the dog is in serious danger dial 999.

If you’re at a shop, venue or event ask the staff to make an announcement to alert the owner of the situation.

If you decide to break a window to release the dog you could be charged with criminal damage. You will have to explain you acted with proper justification in court.

Make sure you tell police what you intend to do and why.

Take pictures or videos of the dog and the names and numbers of witnesses to the incident.

The law states that you have a lawful excuse to commit damage if you believe that the owner of the property that you damage would consent to the damage if they knew the circumstances.

Source: RSPCA

'We offer a free car ventilation service

If you see a dog in distress you can call the RSPCA 24-hour cruelty line for advice on 0300 1234 999 but if you feel the dog is in serious danger dial 999

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