Rare Roman coin minted in London among record number of treasure discoveries

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A rare Roman coin minted in London thousands of years ago is among record amounts of treasure declared today. The bronze coin is thought to be one of the last made during the reign of the British rebel emperor Carausius whose brief reign from AD 286-293 saw Roman Britain break away from the wider empire in continental Europe. Found in Hampshire, it has been donated to the British Museum which today revealed the number of treasure discoveries — which covers gold and silver more than 300 years old and other ancient objects — has hit a record level again.

According to its annual report there were 1,311 finds across England, Wales and Northern Ireland last year. Among the major discoveries, many made by accident or by amateur metal detectorists, is a beautifully preserved 1,100-year-old medieval brooch found in Norfolk believed to have been dumped out with a load of soil from the back of a tipper truck and a solid gold Bronze age arm ring which is so rare experts can not work out where it came from.


Five objects you need to see at the British Museum – In pictures


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Egyptian Mummy Trustees of the British Museum

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The Lewis Chessmen

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The Sutton Hoo Helmet Trustees of the British Museum

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Rosetta Stone Trustees of the British Museum

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Hoa Hakananai’a Moai

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Egyptian Mummy Trustees of the British Museum

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The Lewis Chessmen Trustees of the British Museum

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The Sutton Hoo Helmet

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Rosetta Stone Trustees of the British Museum

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Hoa Hakananai’a Moai Trustees of the British Museum

Caroline Dinenage MP, Minister of State for Digital and Culture, said: “I am very pleased that a record number of treasure finds have been unearthed and it is brilliant that they will now go on display in local museums across the country.

“Each one of these valuable discoveries tells us more about the way our ancestors lived and I want to congratulate all those who played a part in helping uncover more about our shared history.” Data published by the museum also reveals more about smaller finds dating back to 2017 including gold jewellery and buttons found by Thames mudlarks and copper coins found during the upgrade of Bank Station. The 23 coins have gone to the collection of the Museum of London, while the future of other finds is still to be decided.

Hartwig Fischer, Director of the British Museum, said “These discoveries by the public are vital for advancing our understanding of Britain’s diverse history, and it is incredibly encouraging that so many finds have been voluntarily recorded through the British Museum’s Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS).

“PAS and Treasure are truly national partnerships with museums, experts, Finds Liaison Officers and members of the public collaborating together to aid our understanding of the past.”

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