Sponsored: Tyre breakdown in Europe? Do you know what to do?

International haulage is crucial for many UK fleets, with thousands of operators completing European contracts and many European hauliers doing likewise across the UK. UK Government statistics highlight that, from July 2018 to June 2019, international road freight activity completed by UK-registered HGVs saw an increase of 5% in the amount of goods moved compared to the previous 12 months, with a total of 5.5 billion tonne kilometres.  In many cases, such routes mean that a driver can cross through several countries in one trip, making it vital that drivers are aware of the emergency protocols that they should follow in case of a breakdown, wherever they are.

To help with tyre-related breakdowns across Europe, Continental Tyres have created a simple-to-understand list of European Breakdown Regulations for 23 countries in mainland Europe, and the UK.  The document is available for download from Continental's website and, in addition to listing the actions drivers should take in the event of a tyre breakdown, also provides contact details for Continental's Conti360? Breakdown Service hotline in each country.

As well as reinforcing the first steps that drivers should take if they do break down - including stopping in the emergency lane, switching on hazard warning lights, ensuring that a high-visibility vest is worn and placing the warning triangle behind the vehicle - the regulations also list local breakdown rules. Drivers can clearly see - country by country - when they should involve a third party and the police, whether the driver or fleet manager is responsible for making that call, tyre type fitment instructions, country-specific legal authorities and any additional information which could be of use. Continental helped over 29,000 vehicles across Europe get back on the road again in 2018 with its Conti360?

Breakdown Service.

Thanks to its 15,000 service vehicles in the Conti360? network, fleet operators and drivers can rely on a professional and quick response - getting their vehicles and goods back on the road again typically in just over two and a half hours.

In the meantime, the simple-to-use Breakdown Regulations help drivers follow correct procedures for the country they are in, and ensure that they and other road users are as safe as possible until assistance arrives.

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