Hauliers protest at Dublin Port over fuel prices

A second protest in a month by truckers and hauliers threatened to cause significant disruption in Dublin on Monday. auliers from across the country gathered on the outskirts of the city early on Monday, before making their way in convoy into Dublin’s port, with some going through the city centre. The protest has been organised by Irish Truckers and Haulage Association Against Fuel Prices, who say they expect hundreds of trucks and lorries to join the demonstration over the course of the day. A Facebook page which appears to be co-ordinating the protest urged drivers to give way to emergency vehicles and to protest peacefully.

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Drivers gather at Dublin Port (Dominic McGrath/PA)

Drivers gather at Dublin Port (Dominic McGrath/PA)

PA

Drivers gather at Dublin Port (Dominic McGrath/PA)

Drivers at the port say they expected to remain in the city for several hours.

Tom Dineen, one of the drivers, told the PA news agency: “It’s for diesel and taxes and just to get them down. “We’re going to keep doing this and we’re not moving today so we’re going to stay here.” He said they would stay for “as long as it takes” and that more drivers would be arriving as the day went on.

Mr Dineen defended the disruption, saying: “It’s for everyone, it’s not just for us. It’s for every man and woman going to work in the morning. Driving a car, a bike, a van.

It is everyone.” Gardai had warned in advance of possible traffic disruption, with people asked to plan ahead and to use public transport or walk where possible. They gathered in and around Dublin Port as the protest began.

On Sunday, Higher Education Minister Simon Harris said the Government had engaged with the Irish Road Haulage Association, which opposes the protests, over measures to tackle fuel costs.

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Drivers say they expected to remain in the city for several hours (Dominic McGrath/PA)

Drivers say they expected to remain in the city for several hours (Dominic McGrath/PA)

PA

Drivers say they expected to remain in the city for several hours (Dominic McGrath/PA)

“That’s the way to do business though. What is not the way to do business is for splinter groups to blockade, effectively, our capital city tomorrow and cause other hard-pressed taxpayers very significant difficulty in going about their business, and indeed people in accessing our health services and the like.” Andrew Cast, a driver from Kinsale in Co Cork, drove up to Dublin on Sunday.

“Something needs to change, something has to happen.” He did not rule out more protests in the future if the Government fails to respond. “They’re all civil servants.

They’re all employed by us to do their job and they’re not doing it.

They’re not working on our behalf, which they’re paid to do.”