Lorry ban on high street introduced

A new weight limit has been introduced in Nailsea High Street – but can’t be fully enforced until other improvements are made. The 7.5 tonne weight limit goes from the western end of the High Street to the junction with the Link Road. The move follows mounting concerns about the number of heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) using the town centre. The High Street is currently quite narrow with a number of parking bays and traffic calming measures, making it a tricky route for larger vehicles to negotiate.

Lorry drivers are asked to use Stockway North and South, Queens Road and Station Road rather than the High Street. It is thought that some of the drivers may mistakenly use the High Street after being directed to it as a route by their sat navs. READ MORE: Nailsea residents risk ‘life and limb’ due to soaring traffic levels

A planter has now been put in place at the western entrance to the High Street to reduce the width of the carriageway to 3.6 metres. The reduced width will still allow emergency vehicles and essential vehicles, such as waste trucks, to get through. The new weight limit however cannot be officially enforced until improvements are made to the service road which runs at the rear of the shops at Station Road so it can be used by HGVs making deliveries.

Plans are currently being drawn up for the improvements which will include removing uneven pavements and putting in loading bays for the shops. Pavements damaged by tree roots will be removed and instead re-routed into the car park. Nailsea Town Council clerk Jo Duffy said: “The plans are currently in the draft stages and have yet to be formalised. “A planter has been installed at the western end of the High Street which should deter any HGVs from using it.

The only traffic using the High Street should be vehicles of 7.5 tonnes and under although there are exemptions in place for certain businesses until the service road is sorted.” A spokesman for North Somerset Council said: “Retailers along with all other properties along the length of the High Street requiring HGV deliveries to be made will have a viable alternative for their delivery access when the improvements to the southern service road (Brockway Sliproad) are delivered later this financial year, at which point the sign can be erected and the strict 7.5t weight limit can be enforced.” The top end of the High Street, which is a bus route, remains unaffected by the weight limit.

READ NEXT: