Queen lying in state: public warned of 24-hour wait to see coffin as queue stretches across London – live

In an update at 8am this morning, the DCMS said the end point of the queue for the Queen's lying in state was once more accessible in Southwark park.

The DCMS had earlier warned people not to travel to join the queue and to check back later on Saturday morning for updates on wait times.

The latest waiting time is now said to be 24 hours, though there are warnings entry to the queue may once again be paused if the park reaches capacity.

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN'S LYING-IN-STATE QUEUE UPDATE, 8AM, 17 SEP The queue is in Southwark Park and wait times are at least 24 hours If the park reaches capacity, entry to the queue will be paused pic.twitter.com/urY8RxfNHj

-- Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (@DCMS) September 17, 2022

In a sign of just how fixated some people have become with 'The Queue', this morning's BBC weather forecast included a specific temperature prediction for it - a chilly seven degrees.

Good morning!

It's a chilly start out there ...even a bit of frost around for some of you Matt | https://t.co/DZH80OEqu3 pic.twitter.com/Hgu7suCfgv

-- BBC Weather (@bbcweather) September 17, 2022

In an update at 8am this morning, the DCMS said the end point of the queue for the Queen's lying in state was once more accessible in Southwark park.

The DCMS had earlier warned people not to travel to join the queue and to check back later on Saturday morning for updates on wait times.

The latest waiting time is now said to be 24 hours, though there are warnings entry to the queue may once again be paused if the park reaches capacity.

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN'S LYING-IN-STATE QUEUE UPDATE, 8AM, 17 SEP The queue is in Southwark Park and wait times are at least 24 hours

If the park reaches capacity, entry to the queue will be paused pic.twitter.com/urY8RxfNHj

-- Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (@DCMS) September 17, 2022

Miles of television broadcast cabling has been laid, almost every satellite truck in the UK has been hired out and international broadcasters are offering wads of money to anyone who can secure them a broadcast location overlooking the ceremony.

Monday's funeral of Queen Elizabeth II is a global TV event that has been planned for decades - yet at the same time pulled together in just 10 days.

"I've been in the business so long I first started rehearsing the Bridges Events 30 years ago," said the presenter Dermot Murnaghan, 64, referring to an internal codename for deaths of major royals.

Yet even the best-rehearsed plans can fall apart, as Murnaghan found out last Thursday when telling viewers that the Queen had died. "It ended up with me making the announcement in the pouring rain holding an umbrella, my phone, and with water peeing down my neck."

Almost every major British TV channel - with the exception of Channel 5, which is showing the Emoji Movie - has cleared its schedule for royal coverage on Monday.

For the most part, viewers will see the same raw images of the main events on the BBC, ITV and Sky News. All three outlets have coordinated on a plan to pool their resources in order to provide a single national video feed of proceedings.

Monarch's funeral shaping up to be TV event of the century Read more

Here is a quick summary of what to expect on the agenda today:

  • The Queen's lying in state continues, with representatives from the Commonwealth realms invited to pay their respects.

  • The King will meet the chiefs of staff at Buckingham Palace, before visiting police headquarters to thank representatives from the emergency services involved in the planning and delivery of the events during this period.

  • The King and Queen Consort will attend a lunch for governor generals. The King will then meet realm prime ministers at Buckingham Palace.

  • On Saturday evening, the Queen's eight grandchildren will stand vigil beside her coffin.

    The Prince of Wales will stand at the head and the Duke of Sussex at the foot. At the King's request, they will both be in uniform with Harry, as a nonworking royal, granted permission for the solemn occasion. The other grandchildren will be in morning coats and dark formal dress with decorations.

  • A rehearsal for the funeral service will take place inside Westminster Abbey.

If you didn't see the news last night, a man has been arrested "following a disturbance" in Westminster Hall, after reports of someone running up the steps to the catafalque and touching the coffin.

The Metropolitan police were said to have rushed to detain the man just before 10pm on Friday evening, the second full day that mourners have been able to pay their respects to the former monarch, just hours after senior royals held a vigil.

A source told the Guardian that the man darted out of the line passing the catafalque and managed to climb the steps and touch the coffin, before they were swiftly detained - an account that was not denied by either the Met or House of Commons.

Man detained after 'disturbance' at Queen's lying in state in WestminsterRead more

Since it was confirmed last Saturday that Queen Elizabeth's funeral would be held on Monday 19 September, a slew of businesses and services have said they will be reducing operations or closing for all or part of the day as a mark of respect.

With the day declared a bank holiday, many employers have given staff the entire day off and most shops will be closed.

So what will be open on Monday and when?

Which businesses will be open or shut on the day of the Queen's funeral?Read more

Liz Truss is holding the first of her confirmed meetings with world leaders today, as they make the trip to the UK for the Queen's funeral.

The prime minister will speak with New Zealand's premier, Jacinda Ardern, and Australian leader, Anthony Albanese, on Saturday, with the conversations framed by No 10 as chats rather than formal bilateral meetings.

Downing Street suggested they would be an opportunity for condolences over the Queen's death, with politics likely to come up.

The first of the weekend's meetings will be based at the government's Chevening country residence, rather than Chequers, which is said to be undergoing routine maintenance work after Boris Johnson's exit.

Ardern has said the Queen's death and new King will be the "focus of conversation", with the pair also likely to discuss Ukraine and the UK's free trade agreement with New Zealand. The conversation between Truss and Albanese may also touch on trade, with the countries last year signing a deal estimated by the government to be worth GBP2.3bn to the UK economy.

The prime minister, Liz Truss, exits Llandaff Cathedral in Cardiff on Friday after a service of prayer and reflection for the life of the Queen.

Truss also has a packed diary on Sunday, with plans to meet the US president, Joe Biden, Irish taoiseach, Micheal Martin, Canadian premier, Justin Trudeau, and the Polish leader, Andrzej Duda, in Downing Street.

Truss previously met Biden as foreign secretary, but this will be their first in-person conversation since she became prime minister.

It will take place against a backdrop of disputes over the Northern Ireland protocol and difficulties working towards a trade deal with the White House.

The controversial post-Brexit treaty is also likely to come up when she speaks to Martin, amid strained relations between the two countries over the trading arrangements.

Meanwhile, the Chinese foreign ministry has confirmed the country's vice-president, Wang Qishan, will attend the state funeral on Monday, rather than leader Xi Jinping. He is not expected to be among those to meet Truss during the visit.

The Queen's grandchildren will stand guard around her coffin in Westminster today, hours after their parents held their own vigil.

Notably, the Duke of Sussex will join his brother the Prince of Wales in wearing uniform around the coffin in Westminster Hall.

Harry, who saw action on the frontline during two tours of duty in Afghanistan, has previously been denied the chance to wear his military uniform as he publicly mourns because he is no longer a working royal.

Despite being a former army officer, he has been in civilian dress for official events, including walking behind his grandmother's coffin on Wednesday when it was carried to Westminster Hall for lying in state.

But royal sources say the King has decided his youngest son can wear uniform for the vigil, saying he will stand at the foot of the coffin, with William at the head.

William will be flanked by his cousins Zara Tindall and Peter Philips, while Harry will be with Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie, with Lady Louise Windsor and her brother Viscount Severn at the middle of the coffin.

On Friday evening, the Queen's children, Charles, the Duke of York, the Princess Royal and the Earl of Wessex, took part in their own vigil.

Members of the public file past as King Charles III, the Princess Royal, the Duke of York and the Earl of Wessex hold a vigil beside the coffin of their mother, Queen Elizabeth II.People queue up to pay their respects in the early hours of Saturday.Members of the public using blankets to stay warm.Members of the public file past Queen Elizabeth II's casket at midnight in Westminster Hall.

The queue to see the queen's coffin is now "near total capacity" with a wait time of more than 24 hours, the government has warned.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is urging people not to travel to join it.

Overnight, the wait time to see the coffin passed 25 hours.

Good morning.

Members of the public have once again queued through the night to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth II, whose coffin remains in Westminster Hall in central London.

The government says the wait time is now more than 24 hours and people are urged not to travel to join the queue until further notice.

Last night, three measured taps of the guard's stick on the stone steps inside Westminster Hall signalled the start of the vigil of the princes as the Queen's four children, led by the King, marched slowly down, stopping in front of the catafalque.

Another triple tap, and they stepped on to it. King Charles, red-eyed and blinking, took up his place at the head of the coffin, the Princess Royal and Earl of Wessex to each side of it, and the Duke of York at its foot.

Members of the public continued to file slowly past on both sides as the King and his siblings mounted guard. Other members of the royal family, including the Queen Consort and Countess of Wessex, watched from nearby.

After 15 minutes, and with another triple tap, the four stepped down, their vigil done.

Today, it will be the turn of the Queen's grandchildren.

We'll bring you updates from that, and any other royal developments, throughout the day.