Category: Colne

Appeal for HGV driver after Blackburn crash

A man’s been left in a serious condition after being hit by a car in Blackburn.
The 59-year-old suffered serious head injuries and a broken leg after being hit on Barbara Castle Way yesterday (29/10/16) at 2.15pm.
He was taken to Royal Preston Hospital…

Driver airlifted to hospital after crashing lorry through dry stone wall

A DRIVER was airlifted to hospital after crashing his lorry through a dry stone wall.

Two fire crews and a specialist rescue team were called to Smithy Lane, Colne, a remote country lane close to Burwain Sailing Club, at 6.40am today.

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A fire service spokesman, said: “A HGV had gone through a dry stone wall.

“The accident had left a man injured and trapped in the cab.

“The call for firefighters came from paramedics at the scene and fire engines and two crews turned out from Colne.

“Also sent were a team from Chorley who have the equipment and skills required when heavy vehicles are involved in collisions.

“In fact the usual hydraulic equipment and techniques were enough to release the casualty, who was taken to Royal Preston Hospital by Air Ambulance.”

The man’s injuries are not thought to be life threatening.

‘There was no action the HGV driver could have done to avoid the collision’

A WOMAN on a charity cycle ride was killed instantly when she fell off her bike into the path of a heavy goods lorry, an inquest heard.

Susan Smith, 55, was part way through a 124-mile ride along the Leeds and Liverpool Canal when the fatal accident happened in Skipton Road, Colne, on September 21 last year.

Miss Smith, from Wallasey, Merseyside, who was a manager at Marks and Spencer, had organised the ride in aid of Macmillan Cancer Support.

She and four colleagues and friends had travelled by train to Leeds and had cycled around 80 miles that day, stopping for lunch in Skipton.

At around 2.25pm the party had left the canal after struggling to ride on grassy towpaths and had made a decision to head to Colne railway station to make up part of the journey, the hearing was told.

One of the other riders, Neil Drummond, told the hearing he was riding behind Miss Smith, who he described as ‘an experienced and competent cyclist’.

He told the court they were all riding on the pavement on an upward incline close to Langroyd Road when he saw her bike wobble and then her left handlebar struck a dry stone wall causing her to overbalance and fall between the cab unit and the trailer of the lorry, which was part way through passing her.

PC John Birch said he had examined the MAN articulated goods vehicle involved and Miss Smith’s bike and there were no contributing mechanical factors.

He said: “A tachograph reading showed the lorry was travelling at 18mph and was 1.1 metres from the kerb.

“There was no action the HGV driver could have done to avoid the collision.”

Recording a conclusion that Miss Smith died in a road traffic accident, coroner Richard Taylor, said: “This started as a day full of enthusiasm to undertake this significant challenge organised by herself.”

“It seems she lost her balance and the bike wobbled as a result of low speed on the upward incline combined with fatigue from the ride.”

In the aftermath of the tragedy, the fundraising target of £515 shot to more than £2,500, with many donations coming from people in the Pendle area.

A12 burning lorry crash: Driver describes ‘scary’ scenes as smoke ‘covers’ road

Comments (0)[1]

A driver on the A12 has described “scary” scenes after a lorry fell off a bridge and caught fire, “covering” the road with smoke.

Arline Sloan, 35, of De Vere Road in Colchester, was driving on the A12 Northbound from Chelmsford[2] to Earls Colne at around 4.05pm today (February 8) to take her 11-year-old daughter Melissa to a swimming lesson.

She said: “We got stuck near the second turn-off for Witham[3] as suddenly the traffic came to a halt.

READ MORE: A12 to be closed for several hours after lorry falls onto carriageway
[4]

“I thought nothing of it and then I looked up and saw a huge puff of black smoke covering the carriageway.

Follow all the latest updates in our live blog
[5]

“There were a lot of sirens and police. Everybody was getting out of their cars. It was quite scary.

READ MORE: A12 traffic: How to get home after burning lorry crash closes road near Witham
[6]

“We can smell the smoke strongly. We have been sitting here for about an hour.”

Ms Sloan added that a number of emergency vehicles have past including “a lot of unmarked police cars” and around seven police motorbikes.

References

  1. ^ Comments (0) (www.essexlive.news)
  2. ^ Chelmsford (essexlive.news)
  3. ^ Witham (essexlive.news)
  4. ^ A12 to be closed for several hours after lorry falls onto carriageway (www.essexlive.news)
  5. ^ live blog (www.essexlive.news)
  6. ^ A12 traffic: How to get home after burning lorry crash closes road near Witham (www.essexlive.news)

Charity bike rider was killed by lorry

A WOMAN on a charity cycle ride was killed instantly when she fell off her bike into the path of a heavy goods lorry, an inquest heard.

Susan Smith, 55, was part way through a 124-mile ride along the Leeds and Liverpool Canal when the fatal accident happened in Skipton Road, Colne, on September 21 last year.

Miss Smith, from Wallasey, Merseyside, who was a manager at Marks and Spencer, had organised the ride in aid of Macmillan Cancer Support.

She and four colleagues and friends had travelled by train to Leeds and had cycled around 80 miles that day, stopping for lunch in Skipton.

At around 2.25pm the party had left the canal after struggling to ride on grassy towpaths and had made a decision to head to Colne railway station to make up part of the journey, the hearing was told.

One of the other riders, Neil Drummond, told the hearing he was riding behind Miss Smith, who he described as ‘an experienced and competent cyclist’.

He told the court they were all riding on the pavement on an upward incline close to Langroyd Road when he saw her bike wobble and then her left handlebar struck a dry stone wall causing her to overbalance and fall between the cab unit and the trailer of the lorry, which was part way through passing her.

PC John Birch said he had examined the MAN articulated goods vehicle involved and Miss Smith’s bike and there were no contributing mechanical factors.

He said: “A tachograph reading showed the lorry was travelling at 18mph and was 1.1 metres from the kerb.

“There was no action the HGV driver could have done to avoid the collision.”

Recording a conclusion that Miss Smith died in a road traffic accident, coroner Richard Taylor, said: “This started as a day full of enthusiasm to undertake this significant challenge organised by herself.”

“It seems she lost her balance and the bike wobbled as a result of low speed on the upward incline combined with fatigue from the ride.”

In the aftermath of the tragedy, the fundraising target of £515 shot to more than £2,500, with many donations coming from people in the Pendle area.

Campaigners fight for mitigation to protect Bucks from impact of HS2

A group of experts, local politicians and concerned neighbours have lobbied HS2 LTD for a raft of mitigation measures[1] to lessen the train’s impact.

Campaigners[2] called for a lower tunnel depth, the protection of the River Misbourne and the improvement of the roads on which HGV traffic would travel around Little Missenden at a House of Lords Select Committee[3] meeting held on Monday (November 7).

Leather Lane, The Lee, near Great Missenden

Representing campaign group Save St Giles[4] , Rafael McDonnell said: “The original route proposed a line bypassing the centre of the village by a depth of 100 metres.

“But the new route comes through the heart of the village, intersecting the river from 100 meters.

“The tunnel as it passes under the centre of our village is at a depth of 19 metres which we believe, due to the geological make up of the land around Chalfont St Giles, is not sufficient. “19 metres is not much more than the length of this room.”

He added: “We don’t believe the full implications have been assessed in terms of when this new route was put through the heart of the village and so we’re asking for two things to be considered.

HS2 were spotted drilling Stone Meadow without permission earlier this year

“One, the route of the tunnel is drilled deeper underneath the village and two, the river is safeguarded to lessen potential impact on the village and the environmental impact.”

“We believe to date a lot of the work that had been done was based on desk based research. We feel there’s not a thorough understanding of the area of the makeup of the soil and the surrounding land in our village.”

“We feel that we cannot afford to wait and see, that some of the damage could be irrversible.”

Dr Ian Cloke, vice-president of Tullow Oil, giving evidence as a witness, said that HS2 had chosen a route ‘without sufficient study’, as the tunnel would ‘badly impact’ both the River Misbourne and Chalfont St Giles.

He argued the tunnel should be built at a minimum depth of 50 metres underground, saying the currently proposed tunnel depth of 19 metres was only 3.5 metres beneath rotten chalk.

Dr Cloke said: “It’s not until 16 metres we get into solid chalk.

“It’s a very sensitive interface. It is less than the height of a door before we get into weak ground.

“I would be very worried about that if I was running the project.”

An artists impression of the Colne Valley Viaduct which has been given the go ahead by the Department for Transport

Highlighting the levels of vibration expected from a service through which 18 trains per hour would pass, he said the tunnel was only 200 metres from a listed church.

He added: “Additional tunnel depth beneath the Misbourne is essential.

“If we do this, you can mitigate chalk collapse possibility, it mitigates risk of reduction of flow of the Misbourne, it mitigates shallow fracture risk and damage to buildings, its deeper in the chalk, it’s away from nodules and easier to drill.

“Increasing depth below the Misbourne simple. We believe it’s eminently achievable and the question would be, why would HS2 not do it?”

Bob Older, on behalf of the Misbourne River Action Group, argued that the proposed mitigation of the risk of loss of flow in the river due to tunneling and vibration of trains is ‘insufficient’.

He said: “The River Misbourne is very special. It is one of the Chilterns’ chalk streams – globally rare there are fewer chalk streams in the world than there are giant pandas, and three quarters of of them are in the UK.”

Mr Older argued the river provides special habitats, is a ‘much loved amenity’ and helps to define the village ‘as the community that it is’.

He also argued that sufficient measures should be taken should be taken to ensure the river is kept wet to prevent it from sinking into the ground.

He said that HS2 accepts a risk exists and called for the use of Bentomat lining – a geosynthetic clay liner – ‘wherever the line crosses under the Misbourne to’ for a distance for around 400 metres to mitigate this risk.

A protest over HS2 High Speed Rail outside Houses of Parliament. Westminster in 2011.

He added: “The risk of damage to this important and enigmatic river can be reduced by deepening the tunnel and that reduced risk can be mitigated by this simple solution.

“This mitigation also eliminates the chance that in years to come after expensive experts and lawyers on both sides have exhausted their briefs, contractors will need to return to site to put matters right, possibly by lining the effective sections.”

Andrew Cordiner, witness for Little Missenden Parish Council, argued for a number of measures to improve expected traffic increases and road safety around Little Missenden.

He said the A413 dual carriageway, on which HGV construction traffic will travel, has had 23 accidents in the last five years and that a ‘77% and 92% increase in HGVs on the A413 will create congestion’.

He added: “This will introduce significant and unaddressed consequences for other roads and other road users.”

Because the area lies in the AONB, Mr Cordiner said there was no street lighting or pavements, meaning ‘kids as young as three walk to school or pre-school without pavements’ and secondary school children must ‘regularly walk in the road’.

He called for a declaration lane at the Little Missenden vent shaft, for the use of an existing declaration lane via road known locally as Pipers Wood Road and argued for a stacking lane along the dual carriageway, because without one there would be a ‘significant safety risk’.

Chartered surveyor Mr Cordiner said roads connecting to the dual carriageway are ancient, single track roads and given the expected ‘intensification’ of them ‘are acutely vulnerable to an increase in traffic’, adding there must be ‘penalties’ for contractors contravening HS2’s code of practice.

He added: “This ancient landscape is completely incapable of sustaining the traffic necessary to safely build this line.”

Speaking after the meeting Mr Cordiner, from Hyde Heath, said: “We’re getting to the witching hour.

“The problem is they [HS2] will have royal assent. Once they have that they will have statutory protection and we won’t be able to sue them.

“And the committee is just listening to us, listening to them and not doing anything.”

HS2 High Speed Rail Line.

Mr Cordiner also cited a ‘property building issue’ that HS2 would bring.

He said: “There’s a lady there from the Chalfonts who said she will be stuck in her house for 10 years and will be trapped.

“And in 10 years she will have to remortgage her property but she won’t be able to get the same mortgage rates because of HS2.

“It took me 18 months to remortgage my property.

“The committee need to interrogate the evidence.”

References

  1. ^ mitigation measures (www.getbucks.co.uk)
  2. ^ Campaigners (www.getbucks.co.uk)
  3. ^ House of Lords Select Committee (www.getbucks.co.uk)
  4. ^ Save St Giles (www.getbucks.co.uk)