A11

A11 closed for three hours after lorry crash

A lorry has crashed on the A11. Picture: Matt Lawson

A lorry has crashed on the A11. Picture: Matt Lawson

Archant

The A11 has re-opened after a lorry crash forced it to close northbound for more than three hours.

The A11 roundabout at Barton Mills/Mildenhall. Pic: Google Maps.The A11 roundabout at Barton Mills/Mildenhall. Pic: Google Maps.

The dual carriageway closed between the A1065 and the A1101, at Five Ways Roundabout, near Mildenhall, in Suffolk.

The HGV struck the central reservation after the crossroads with the B1112. One lane was also closed southbound due to damage to the central reservation and debris.

Suffolk Police were called to the scene at about 10.15am on Thursday, May 21, with Highways England assisting with clean-up, recovery, and traffic management.

A Suffolk Police spokesman said that the road re-opened at about 1.30pm.

Check the EDP Live Traffic Map before you travel.


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A11 closed after lorry overturns

The A11 roundabout at Barton Mills/Mildenhall. Pic: Google Maps.

The A11 roundabout at Barton Mills/Mildenhall. Pic: Google Maps.

Google Maps

A lorry has overturned on the A11 forcing it to close northbound.

The dual carriageway is closed between the A1065 and the A1101, at Five Ways Roundabout, near Mildenhall, in Suffolk.

The HGV struck the central reservation after the crossroads with the B1112. One lane is closed southbound due to damage to the central reservation and debris.

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Suffolk Police were called to the scene at about 10.15am on Thursday, May 21, and are on scene. Highways England is assisting with clean-up, recovery, and traffic management.

A Suffolk Police spokesman said that the northbound road will have to be closed for recovery and clean-up to be completed.

A diversion is available around the incident: From the Five Ways roundabout take the A1065 northbound to Brandon. Turn right on to the B1106 towards Elveden. Then turn left on to Green Road. Turn right on to the B1107 and continue on this road to Thetford and the roundabout with the A11.

Check the EDP Live Traffic Map before you travel.


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A11 in Norfolk shut at Attleborough after lorry crash

Part of the A11 near Attleborough has been shut after a lorry crashed. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Part of the A11 near Attleborough has been shut after a lorry crashed. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Archant

A lorry crash completely shut the Norwich-bound A11 at Attleborough.

Emergency services were called to the crash, involving a lorry, at just before 5am today (Friday, April 10).

Firefighters from Attleborough and Wymondham went to the scene, helping treat a casualty.

They also put down granules to make the area safe, but the road has been shut in the Norwich direction.

Norfolk police said, in a tweet at just after 5.45am: “The Norwich bound carriageway at Attleborough is completely closed due to an HGV collision.

“The southbound carriageway is open. Highways Agency on scene, diversions being implemented.”

Highways England tweeted that the northbound carriageway was shut from the Stag roundabout to the B1077 because of a “serious traffic collision”.

They said an HGV which was travelling on the southbound carriageway had crossed the central reservation.

They added that the agency’s contractors were working to clear debris and spillages at the scene.

Norfolk police also tweeted that the crash had meant that a footpath had been closed.

They said: “The footpath next to the A11 Attleborough bypass (northbound) between W Carr Road – where the blue footbridge crosse the A11 near to the Stag roundabout – and Crowshall Lane, near the B1077 Queens Road, is currently closed.”

It is understood that the lorry had been towed away from the scene by 8.30am.

Highways England tweeted at just after 11am that the carriageway had reopened.

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A47 shut after lorry and van crash

Emergency services are on the scene of a crash on the A47. Photo : Steve Adams

Emergency services are on the scene of a crash on the A47. Photo : Steve Adams

Copyright Archant Norfolk 2016

Motorists faced delays and diversions on the A47 after a crash between a lorry and a van.

The crash has happened near The Canary and Linnet pub, off the A47 in Little Fransham. Picture: ArchantThe crash has happened near The Canary and Linnet pub, off the A47 in Little Fransham. Picture: Archant

Police were called at 11.08am today to a crash near the Canary and Linnet Pub, in Little Fransham between Dereham and Swaffham.

The road was blocked in both directions from Station Road to Dunham Road and re-opened at about 2,30pm.

Emergency services attended but no-one is believed to have been trapped or suffered serious injuries.

An extensive clean-up operation was launched by the police and Highways England as diesel has spilled onto the road and damage had been caused to a lamp post.

Road users were advised to expect disruption and to allow extra journey time.

Diversion route details;

Eastbound – Exit the A47 at Swaffham Interchange.

At the A1065 junction turn right and follow the A1065 to Fakenham.

At the A148 roundabout take the second exit onto the A148.

Continue on the A148 to the next roundabout and take the third right onto the A1067.

Continue on the A1067 through Bintree, Bawdeswell, Morton, Attlebridge, Taversham and Drayton to A140 Ring Road in Norwich.

At the A140 roundabout take the third exit onto the A140.

At the next roundabout take the third exit onto the A1074 and rejoin the A47 at Longwater Interchange.

Westbound – Exit the A47 at Thickthorn Interchange and take first exit from the roundabout onto the A11.

Continue on A11 to Mundford Road roundabout at Thetford.

Take third exit from the roundabout and continue on A134 to the A1065 roundabout at Munford.

At the roundabout take the third exit and continue on the A1065 to rejoin the A47 at Swaffham Interchange.

Check the EDP live traffic map before you travel.[2]

References

  1. ^ Share (www.edp24.co.uk)
  2. ^ Check the EDP live traffic map before you travel. (www.edp24.co.uk)

Celebrating 60 years of Anglia TV with old friends and colleagues

Opinion

60th anniversary reunion of previous Anglia employees, presenters etc at the Holiday Inn Norwich Airport. Photo: Brittany Woodman

60th anniversary reunion of previous Anglia employees, presenters etc at the Holiday Inn Norwich Airport. Photo: Brittany Woodman

Archant

Paul Barnes had reason to celebrate last week as he was reunited with former Anglia TV colleagues as the station marked its 60th birthday

Helen McDermott at the 60th anniversary reunion of previous Anglia employees, presenters etc at the Holiday Inn Norwich Airport. Photo: Brittany WoodmanHelen McDermott at the 60th anniversary reunion of previous Anglia employees, presenters etc at the Holiday Inn Norwich Airport. Photo: Brittany Woodman

So many faces, so many stories, so many grins and waves from across the crowded room: over 200 of us Anglia Relics, relics of the real Anglia TV, marked the 60th anniversary of the first broadcast last Monday.

There were lots of grey hairs, or acres of pink flesh where the hair once was.

Some of the relics had worked in the early days on Anglia’s famous dramas with big names. The original board of Anglia had included Sir John Woolf of Romulus Films, and from the word go he pushed for a significant part of the company’s output to be drama.

And he had the connections to make it happen. He beckoned and the stars came out to Norfolk, stepping from the big screen to the small one. The likes of Margaret Leighton, John Gregson, Edith Evans, Susannah York, Diane Cilento, Kenneth More, Telly Savalas, Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, and many more took trains from Liverpool Street or trundled up the A11.

They found a definite quaintness about their destination, the one-time Agricultural Hall, dating from 1882. The Anglia studios were built inside the shell of the building with its Victorian girders visible, painted blue and gold. People tagged it “Nineteenth Century Fox”. Everybody thought David Niven coined the description but the real credit goes to Bill Brennan, the floor manager who murmured the words to Niven as he sat in make-up.

Day two saw the first edition of The Midday Show which took liberties with the clock by actually going out at two minutes past one. It was a breezy mixture of chat and light music fronted by young Susan Hampshire.

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Seventeen-year-old June Kenny had joined the company a week earlier as a junior cashier. “My job was to go and watch the Midday Show,” she says. “Musicians had to be paid every day. I handed the money out and got them to sign the paperwork. It was fantastic. I can’t believe I’m here watching shows and they’re paying me money to do it.”

Later, as June Wright, she became a production assistant, making sure the right equipment and the right people were in the right place at the right time, skills she applied to helping organise this anniversary shindig.

We worked often together on Portrait of a Village, the region’s Sunday teatime treat. That was in the seventies when a crew of twenty-two took to the road with three cameras, a truck full of cables and a recording van. The vehicles were grey and yellow, rather insipid colours; the word was that nobody would want to steal the paint.

Once, this small army and all the kit were set up for an interview beside the level crossing at Downham Market. We were just going for a take when a Land Rover slowed down and the driver leaned out. “I ‘ope this isn’t another repeat,” says he.

My first day at Anglia in 1977 brought convincing proof that I’d arrived in Norfolk. The assignment was an item for that evening’s About Anglia, coverage of the Norwich Union stagecoach’s journey between Eye and Ipswich. In the back of the Volvo estate Dave Atto, the unit’s electrician was doing the Sun crossword. All was quiet until a broad Norfolk voice wondered “Are there two oo’s in igloo?”

News and features were shot on film in those days, and cans of exposed footage were processed and edited in double quick time. Sometimes there could be a hitch, like the time we turned up at Elveden to do a piece on the latest Bond epic, including an interview with Pierce Brosnan. We opened the camera case. It was empty. Waiting for one to be sent from Norwich we had a pleasant time making the most of the catering truck. It could be a tough life.

As the Anglia Relics gathered and milled around the room was noisy with squeals of recognition, a bit of a trial for deaf-aid wearers; so many bridges, so much water gone by, so many hugs and kisses, so many memories. And afterwards many more stories will have been remembered, ones that we forgot to tell on the day. Ten years from now, perhaps? Dave, one of the organisers is already considering reserving the car park for Zimmer frame races and a mobility scooter rally.

Salt stockpiled as gritters in Norfolk get ready for winter

A digger loading a gritter in one of Norfolk’s salt domes. Pic: Norfolk County Council.

A digger loading a gritter in one of Norfolk’s salt domes. Pic: Norfolk County Council.

Norfolk County Council

Some 16,000 tonnes of salt has been stockpiled in Norfolk to help gritting teams keep the county’s roads clear this winter.

Norfolk county councillor Martin Wilby. Pic: Norfolk Conservatives.Norfolk county councillor Martin Wilby. Pic: Norfolk Conservatives.

The county’s gritters have already been out for their first run of the season – treating roads in the west of the county on Monday, October 28.

Last winter saw 13,600 tonnes of specially formulated salt spread over the council’s 49 gritting routes, which includes all A-class and B-class roads and some C-class roads.

Each run covers 2,200 miles of road and takes three hours to complete.

That was down on the 25,000 tonnes which were used over the previous winter, when the Beast from the East brought heavy snowfall across the county and meant gritters had to go out 113 times.

While 16,000 tonnes is stocked through a long-term contract with supplier Compass Minerals, Norfolk County Council says that will be replenished .

The salt used to treat roads works by reducing the freezing point of water on the surface.

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However, bosses at Norfolk County Council say even when roads are treated there is no guarantee they will be completely clear of ice or snow.

For example, in severe cold weather (below approximately minus seven degrees Celsius) even salt will not prevent the roads from icing over.

A change means this year, the gritting will be done by Norse Highways, on behalf of the county council, although decisions on mobilising crews will still be taken at County Hall.

Martin Wilby, Norfolk County Council cabinet member for highways and infrastructure, said: “The recent move of the day to day highway maintenance operations, including gritting, to Norse Highways, will see some efficiency savings made, but for Norfolk’s roads this winter it will be business as usual.

“The fleet of gritter trucks and the dedicated crews are prepped and ready to grit roads and clear any snow as and when needed.

“I’d urge everyone to take care when roads are cold and wet over the coming months – it’s very important to always drive to arrive, so please do make sure you drive to the road conditions at all times.”

Gritting the A47 and A11 is not the responsibility of Norfolk County Council.

They are treated by Highways England.

Firefighters free driver from overturned truck on A11 near Barton Mills

Suffolk police and Highways England remain on the A11 at Mildenhall after a lorry overturned Picture: NSRAPT

Suffolk police and Highways England remain on the A11 at Mildenhall after a lorry overturned Picture: NSRAPT

NSRAPT

The driver of a lorry has been freed from the inside of his overturned truck by firefighters following a crash on the A11.

The man became medically trapped inside his lorry after it rolled over in the crash around 5.25am, near the Barton Mills roundabout.

Three fire crews from Mildenhall, Bury St Edmunds and Brandon were called to free the man, who thankfully is not said to have suffered any injuries.

Lane two of the A11 southbound remains closed near the roundabout as police await recovery for the vehicle.

The central reservation has also been damaged.

Traffic maps show the road is currently coping well, although further congestion could build during rush hour.