Orange

Elderly man dies in A143 Earsham, Bungay crash

The road in Earsham, Bungay, was closed for more than 10 hours after an elderly man died following a collision with a lorry. Stock image. Picture: WENDY TURNER

The road in Earsham, Bungay, was closed for more than 10 hours after an elderly man died following a collision with a lorry. Stock image. Picture: WENDY TURNER

A man thought to be in his mid 70s has died after being involved in a collision with a lorry in the early hours.

Police were called to Earsham, Bungay, at 1.12am on Sunday to reports of a collision between a lorry and pedestrian.

The man was pronounced dead at the scene and road closures were put in place while investigations were conducted and road cleared.

The road was reopened at 11.33am.

Police would now like help to identify the man who died in the crash.

The man is described as white, between 65 and 80 years old, around 5ft 6in tall, bald with grey hair at the back and side, of an average build.

He was wearing a navy blue fleece top with a JCB logo on the shoulder, grey trousers, dark grey/blue baseball cap with a small penguin motif and navy blue slippers with Velcro strapping.

Acting Detective Inspector Michael Roxby said: “We would be grateful for anyone who may have seen the man on this stretch of road or in the local area in the early hours to get in touch.

“We would also encourage the public to check on elderly male relatives who live in this area and are similar in description.”

Anyone who can help to identify the man or is a witness to the incident should contact Acting Detective Inspector Michael Roxby of Norfolk Constabulary on 101 quoting CAD 23 of Sunday, November 29.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the East Anglian Daily Times. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Woman in 30s killed in car crash on country road

The crash happened on a Suffolk road on Friday morning Picture: ARCHANT

The crash happened on a Suffolk road on Friday morning Picture: ARCHANT

©Archant Photographic 2010

A woman has died following a car crash on a country road in the early hours of Friday morning.

The crash happened on the A1092, between Cavendish and Clare, near Sudbury, at about 12.15am.

Police closed the road for several hours overnight but confirmed the closure had been lifted at 7.15am.

The collision involved a single vehicle – a Vauxhall Corsa travelling in the direction of Cavendish.

The vehicle collided with the roadside bank, according to police.

A spokesman said: “Emergency services attended the scene and the road was closed until about 7.15am while initial investigations were conducted.

“A woman in her early 30s sadly died at the scene. She was the sole occupant of the car and no-one else was hurt.”

Anyone who witnessed the collision is asked to contact the Serious Collision Investigation Unit on 101, quoting CAD 4 of November 27.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the East Anglian Daily Times. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Car in ditch at Dennington cross roads Frostley Bridge person trapped

Police are at the scene of a crash in Dennington near Frostley Bridge, where a car has ended up in a ditch (stock image). Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

Police are at the scene of a crash in Dennington near Frostley Bridge, where a car has ended up in a ditch (stock image). Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

CHARLOTTE BOND

Fire crews are working to free a person who has become trapped inside a vehicle after it crashed into a ditch near Dennington cross roads.

Three fire engines, police and the ambulance service are all at the scene of a single vehicle crash on the B1118 near to Frostley Bridge.

Police were called at 11.40am to reports of a crash on the B1118 junction with the B1116 at Dennington.

You may also want to watch:

A spokesman said it is described as being near to Frostley Bridge junction before Dennington cross roads and a car has crashed into a ditch.

They said: “Two occupants are conscious and breathing but their injuries are unclear.

“The road was closed shortly after 12pm.”

Three fire engines are on scene, from Ipswich East, Framlingham and Stradbroke, along with one ambulance.

A spokesman for Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service said that at least one person is trapped inside the vehicle and crews are working to free the occupants safely.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the East Anglian Daily Times. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

A11 closed in both directions between Attleborough and Thickthorn following four car crash

The A11 has been closed in both directions between Thickthorn and Attleborough following a crash involving five vehicles Picture: Chris Bishop

The A11 has been closed in both directions between Thickthorn and Attleborough following a crash involving five vehicles Picture: Chris Bishop

Archant

A man has been airlifted to hospital with life-threatening injuries following a crash between four cars this afternoon, which has closed a stretch of the A11.

At around 3.10pm, emergency services were called to the A11, between Thickthorn and Attleborough, following a crash involving four cars – including a Jaguar and a Ford Mondeo.

The crash happened in the carriageway heading towards Norwich, however, police have closed the road in both directions to allow the East of England Air Ambulance to land at the scene.

A spokesman for Norfolk Constabulary said the road is likely to be closed “for the foreseeable” while emergency services treat to the people involved and the vehicles are recovered.

Traffic is being diverted away from the scene via the Old A11 and police have warned the road will remain closed for some time.

The northbound carriageway was re-opened at around 4.30pm, but the southbound carriageway remains closed while the vehicles are recovered.

The police spokesman said that “multiple” people had suffered injuries in the crash, including one man who was taken to the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital via air ambulance with “significant and life-threatening injuries”.

The cars involved were a black Jaguar, a silver Ford Mondeo, a silver Ford Focus and a fourth car, which the police did not provide details of.

Anybody who witnessed the crash or has dashcam footage of it is urged to contact Norfolk Constabulary on 101 quoting incident number 195 of November 22.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Eastern Daily Press. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Bloodhounds on the trail as Suffolk hunt takes new turn

Hamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

Hamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

Charlotte Bond

After a breathless chase, the pack finally tracks down its quarry — and a frenzy of licking ensues.

Hamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BONDHamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

The floppy-eared Hamilton Bloodhounds have become a popular sight on their daily exercise run through the village of Easton, near Framlingham.

These crack canine sleuths are trained to track down human runners.

The runners spend time having a ‘big hug’ with the hounds before the hunt so that they can get to know their scent.

MORE — Community mourns death of ‘caring and dedicated’ farmer and family man

Then they are dropped at agreed locations and will lead the pack on a merry chase through the countryside.

Hamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BONDHamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

Using pre-set trails, the runners head off and get as far as they can before the dogs and riders catch them up.

The whole event culminates in a rather slobbery reunion — and as the runners are pre-armed with doggy biscuits and liver snacks — a treat for the dogs.

The Hamilton Bloodhounds was set up last year with the aim of reviving a very old tradition in the village — but with a modern twist.

They are looked after at kennels run by joint master and professional huntsman James Chadwick.

Hamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BONDHamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

The pack’s predecessor — the Easton Harriers — was set up in 1875 by the Duke of Hamilton and historically hunted hares before the hunting ban of 2005.

But the old hunt appeared to have run its course and numbers were dwindling. The pack was rehomed and the hunt itself was on the cusp of disbanding when a group of enthusiasts came up with an idea which is also catching on in other parts of the country.

“We decided as a committee that we wanted to be able to hunt a pack of hounds that we could follow a human scent rather than a trail of artificial scent,” explains joint master Clare Simper.

You may also want to watch:

An entirely new type of ‘hunt’ was devised, and a bloodhound pack was established to track down humans, who would run ahead, thus laying a scent trail for them to follow.

“They go into the truck with the hounds and have a really big hug,” she says. “They are really gorgeous — they are beautiful hounds.”

Clare, along with senior master Lydia Freeman, whip Tegen Dovey who is also James’ partner, chairman Nick Dowding, and secretary Kevin Francis run the meets, which take weeks of careful planning.

As well as doing away with some of the more unhelpful vestiges of the past, the new approach means that a trail can be carefully co-ordinated with the agreement of landowners in the area.

Hamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BONDHamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

“Bloodhounds are tracking hounds they have the most incredible nose for the scent of a human and were used historically to catch criminals and escaped convicts, sometimes being called sleuth hounds,” explains Clare.

“We hunt what is known as “the clean boot” which means we follow the natural scent of a human runner or quarry as they are known.”

With permission from farmers and landowners they usually covering up to 17 miles over three lines of scent. Runners will run three to four mile lines and there are usually three or four lines per meet.

“Hounds, horses, riders and runners are able to have a wonderful day crossing beautiful country and it’s been great to set up a real community with so many people enjoying the experience of being outdoors and having fun.

Hamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BONDHamilton Bloodhounds in Easton with Huntsman James Chadwick, Master Clare Simper and Bill Gilchrist Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

It is that fun approach, explains Clare, which has made the new-style hunt increasingly popular. The old hunt had dwindled to a membership of just 27 — now there are 60-plus.

The Hamilton Hounds meets have inevitably been curtailed by the pandemic, but it’s clear from the reaction so far that many are keen to get involved.

“It just felt the right time to have a change,” says Clare. “There’s a real sense of a lovely community forming now.”

She adds: “Our decision to do what we did was the right decision for us for sure and it’s enhancing lots of people’s lives across many spectrums. It is the next phase of what was a very old hunts history and we are justly proud of it as we hope it will help keep a pack of hounds in Easton for many years to come.”

The Hamilton Bloodhounds are hoping to get back on track after lockdown with Christmas holiday meets planned, restrictions permitting.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the East Anglian Daily Times. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Crash on A1152 at Bromeswell closes road and fire crews called

Police remain at the scene of a crash on the A1152 in Bromeswell, where two drivers sustained serious injuries. Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

Police remain at the scene of a crash on the A1152 in Bromeswell, where two drivers sustained serious injuries. Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

CHARLOTTE BOND

A serious crash involving two vehicles has closed both sides of the A1152 at Bromeswell, with police, ambulance and fire crews on scene.

Police have closed the A1152 in both directions following the serious collision on the A1152 Eyke Road near the B1084 Orford Road and are advising drivers to avoid the area.

A spokesman for Suffolk police said: “We were called just after 8.05am to a two-vehicle RTC on the A1152 at Bromeswell. The road is blocked and currently closed at both ends.

“Injuries have been reported and the fire service is also on scene.”

Three fire crews from Ipswich East, Woodbridge and Princes Street are at the scene of the crash.

Police remain at the scene of a crash on the A1152 in Bromeswell, where two drivers sustained serious injuries. Picture: CHARLOTTE BONDPolice remain at the scene of a crash on the A1152 in Bromeswell, where two drivers sustained serious injuries. Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

A spokesman for Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service said: “We are currently attending a two-vehicle road traffic collision near Bromeswell. Crews have extracted one person from one of the vehicles after a roof removal. Another individual is awaiting extrication.”

Stay with us for more on this breaking news story.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the East Anglian Daily Times. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Fresh consultation and changes to Sizewell C plans

A CGI showing how the new twin reactor Sizewell C would looj if it is built Picture: EDF ENERGY/SIZEWELL C

A CGI showing how the new twin reactor Sizewell C would looj if it is built Picture: EDF ENERGY/SIZEWELL C

Archant

Consultation has been launched today on a series of proposed changes to the plans for Sizewell C – which EDF Energy says would take hundreds of lorries a day off Suffolk’s roads during its construction.

Stop Sizewell C campaigners projected their message onto the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy in London Picture: STOP SIZEWELL CStop Sizewell C campaigners projected their message onto the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy in London Picture: STOP SIZEWELL C

As revealed last month, the company wants to increase substantially the amount of materials being delivered by rail and sea, cutting by 20% the amount travelling by road if the twin reactor nuclear power station is given the go-ahead.

Opponents though say it is “laughable” it has taken so long for changes to be made to the 
strategy for delivering construction materials – after years of protests.

MORE: Sizewell C will be ‘catastrophic’ for coast, warns Wildlife Trust

And they claim EDF is still not disclosing important offshore survey results which are “critical” for its second beach landing facility plans.

The latest round of consultation on the Sizewell C project is under way Picture: EDF ENERGY/SIZEWELL CThe latest round of consultation on the Sizewell C project is under way Picture: EDF ENERGY/SIZEWELL C

Richard Bull, head of transport planning for Sizewell C, said: “Following feedback from East Suffolk and Suffolk County Councils, and from responses to our Development Consent Order (DCO) proposals, we have continued to investigate ways to increase rail and sea deliveries.

“We have been able to identify more of our required material from areas with good rail and sea connections. There is now potential to reduce the total amount of material being moved by road to around 40%.

“If this can be achieved it will be possible to reduce HGV numbers on an average typical day at the peak of construction to 250 (500 two-way movements) and 350 HGVs (700 two-way movements) on the busiest day. This represents a reduction of 150 HGVs on the very busiest day (300 two-way movements) compared to the numbers in the DCO submission.”

Documents issued today in connection with the 30-day consultation say the company is looking at building a beach landing facility for the delivery of large loads by sea and a second temporary landing facility.

Talks are ongoing with Network Rail to see how many extra trains could run.

Options being considered include running four trains (seven overnight movements) rather than three trains (five overnight movements); using five trains a day during the busiest period of construction; and running trains six days a week (Monday to Saturday). Mr Bull said: “We fully understand the concerns about noise on the East Suffolk Line – particularly for overnight freight deliveries. We are investigating continuous welded rail lines, the use of slower speeds and the types of trains that could be used to keep noise to a minimum.”

To cut the amount of materials needing to be moved, EDF would reduce the volume of material that needs to be moved away from the site by using it as fill or for landscaping. Rail and sea will be used “where practicable” and where road remains necessary the aim will be to ensure reduced local impacts via the use of defined routes and systems to control the number and timing of HGV movements.

Humphrey Cadoux-Hudson, Sizewell C managing director, said: “We take the feedback from the councils, MPs and local people extremely seriously and would like to make these updates to our proposals in good time so they can be considered by the planning inspectorate and all interested parties during the next phase of this process.

“We hope these changes will give even greater confidence to local communities that the benefits of this project for Suffolk will far outweigh the potential impacts during construction.”

But Paul Collins, chair of Stop Sizewell C, said: “It’s laughable that it has taken almost 1,300 responses to EDF’s DCO application, and the opposition of the county council and scores of parishes and four previous consultation stages for EDF to begin to listen about HGV traffic and site access.

“EDF is still not making public its surveys of the offshore Sizewell Dunwich Banks – critical for its proposals for a second Beach Landing Facility and its sea defences – nor its evidence over how much CO2 will be emitted during construction.”

Mr Collins said residents were also unhappy at having received more letters for fields and gardens needed in connection with road infrastructure plans, which he described as “land grab”.

Nature experts in Suffolk are also angry over the proposals for the £20billion Sizewell C project – and say they would be “catastrophic” for the county’s wildlife-rich and fragile coast.

EDF Energy has outlined changes to its plans which it says will reduce the use of the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty by using brownfield land for critical buildings that need to be moved, and also to create more fen meadow.

However, the Suffolk Wildlife Trust is still opposing the plans – which are currently before the Planning Inspectorate – and says the development would be “devastating for nature”.

This week the Government has announced ‘greater protections for England’s iconic landscapes’ and has promised to designate more AONB and “to protect and restore our natural environment and diverse ecosystems”.

SWT says Sizewell C would destroy or damage an area the size of around 900 football pitches – 500 hectares – in the middle of the officially designated Suffolk Coast and Heaths AONB, while a Special Area of Conservation, Special Protection Area and a RAMSAR site would also be impacted.

The land includes nationally rare wildlife habitats such as heathland, oak woods, sand dunes, shingle, fen, marsh, reedbed and natural grassland, home to many rare plants, insects, and birds such as barn owl, marsh harrier and kingfisher, and mammals such as water vole.

Christine Luxton, chief executive of Suffolk Wildlife Trust, said: “Sizewell C would destroy a vast swathe of the Suffolk coastline in one of the most beautiful natural parts of the UK. People visit this part of Suffolk from all over the country to enjoy the wild countryside. If this vast development gets the go-ahead, an area of the coast the size of 900 football pitches will be directly affected by the development. Barn owls, water voles and kingfishers will see their habitat destroyed.

“Nature is already in huge trouble and the sheer scale of this development will make a bad situation much, much worse. We will not solve the climate crisis by destroying natural habitats that lock-up carbon. This is the wrong time and the wrong place for such a colossal and damaging development.

“We do not believe it would be possible to make up for the damage Sizewell C would cause to the natural world on this extraordinarily beautiful stretch of coastline.

“We are deeply concerned that the suggested mitigation and compensation would never balance the huge loss to biodiversity and the impacts on our protected sites and species. Whilst compensation sites can be vital to offset any habitat destruction, they cannot replace the higher value of long-established sites with a rich mosaic of species.

“At a time of climate and ecological emergency, we need to find truly sustainable solutions which do not add to the problem by destroying internationally and nationally-important wild places for nature.”

The latest changes proposed by EDF’s consultation include an additional site as further mitigation for a small loss of fen meadow habitat on the SSSI. Along with the existing sites at Benhall and Halesworth, a site near Pakenham in West Suffolk has been identified for a project to enhance the biodiversity of the land.

Other changes include a proposed redesign of the SSSI crossing to a 30m long single-span bridge with embankments. The bridge design would retain “significantly more space” around the Leiston Drain and reduce the amount of SSSI land take. It would provide additional flood relief and greater connectivity for species including water voles, otters and bats, helping wildlife populations.

Katy McGuinness, environment planning manager for Sizewell C, said projects like Aldhurst Farm nature reserve and the Studio Field complex at Sizewell Gap had been developed already with the aim of mitigating the impact building Sizewell C could have on wildlife in and around the temporary construction area.

She added: “Taking inspiration from a similar project in Dorset, we intend to establish an independent Environmental Trust to manage the ongoing re-wilding and biodiversity of the growing Sizewell estate. We will commit to contributing to the Trust every year during the operation of Sizewell C, with a view to expanding and connecting further parcels of land identified for re-wilding and habitat creation.”


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the East Anglian Daily Times. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Driver sustains serious injuries after lorry overturns on NDR at Salhouse

Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

Archant

A driver has been taken to hospital with serious injuries after a lorry overturned on the Northern Distributor Road (NDR).

Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANOverturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

Police were called to the Broadland Northway A1270 at about 5.20am on Monday, November 16 after a lorry had overturned on the roundabout at Salhouse Road.

Firefighters attended and freed the driver, who has since been taken to hospital by ambulance with serious injuries.

The road was closed eastbound from the Wroxham Road roundabout while the lorry is recovered.

Fire appliances from Sprowston, Carrow and Wroxham attended were called to provide vehicle stability and assist the ambulance service.

Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANOverturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

The crash has resulted in long delays in the area while there has also been disruption on public transport, with Konectbus tweeting there may be delays due to the overturned lorry.

Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANOverturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN
Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANOverturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN
Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANOverturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN
Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANOverturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN
Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANOverturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN
Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANOverturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN
Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANOverturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN
Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANOverturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN
Overturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMANOverturned lorry on the NDR Salhouse Rd roundabout. Pictures: BRITTANY WOODMAN

If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Eastern Daily Press. Click the link in the orange box above for details.